Collected a few yew today

somegeek

Yamadori
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I had the opportunity today to collect a few small Hemlocks (corrected - thanks Ianb/JasonG).

The root system on this tree was insane. It had a patch of roots roughly 1ft sq (like a moist mat of canvas) under a rock it was next to.





This tree was removed from a ditch. Pruning by snowplow no doubt. This one has a nice nebari - four strong lateral roots just below the bark in this image.





This tree had just a few long roots and rested above a rock under a small bit of soil.





Collecting these was pretty easy as they sat in a sandy mix of soil which was on the dry side. All three trees are in a 50/50 bark / turface/perlite mix and in the shade. I'd put them into the ground but I don't really have the room for that unfortunately.

I did see some larger specimens but wanted to cut my teeth on collecting just a few of these smaller ones.

somegeek
 
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ianb

Shohin
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Are yew sure it's a yew, looks more like hemlock to me...

Still nice material though:D
 
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The frist two are likely Mountain Hemlock... but the last one is not... it's Western Hemlock. :)

V
 

somegeek

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Thanks for the correction on this. :) What are the notable differences when discerning between yew and hemlock foliage?

somegeek
 

JasonG

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The frist two are likely Mountain Hemlock... but the last one is not... it's Western Hemlock. :)

V
Western Hemlocks in Northern Oregon and Southern Washington look nothing like that. They are darker green, and have a much different needle.....
 

somegeek

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Should I wait until the spring to do any wiring on these trees?

somegeek
 

ghues

Omono
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Should I wait until the spring to do any wiring on these trees?

somegeek
Maybe...... but I'd wait until they made it through the summer of 2011. Fertilize them well as they do look a little weak at the moment (at least the last two do). I also know from experience that if they are not healthy and you try to wire a branch with too much of an angle or when its dormant, one can loose or harm the branch.

Jason, I know that there can be a lot of regional differences between species but like Ms. Vic I do believe that the last two trees could be western hemlock or maybe a hybrid btwn the two?

I'm just glad we are seeing more PNW species on the NUT these days.
Cheers
 

ghues

Omono
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YEW = Hemlock

Attached is a great photo of a Mt. Hm, notice how the branch looks like a brush with the needles mostly pointing upwards whereas the Western foliage tends to lay more horizontal, like the ones you collected.
G
 

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Jason...

While there is no doubt in my mind that you are very familiar with regional species, I have to disagree with you on this one. The photo I am attaching is of a "ditch-a-dori" I collected a few years ago which actually started out looking almost exactly the same as somegeek's. Mine is without doubt Western Hemlock, and as has been pointed out, the foliage pattern is very specific on them.

You can see how the comparison would provide me the basis of my conviction on this.... ;)

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
 

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Mojosan

Mame
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Isn't this a little early (or much too late) to be collecting material such as this? I would think late Oct-Nov would be more appropriate and less stressful on the tree. :confused:
 
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With appropriate aftercare it's not impossible... but yes... it is better to wait and increase your odds. ;)

V
 

digger714

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Im in the same shape, i have several jobs this week and next that are all taking out older landscapes, and am getting ready for a big week, even though its not the right time. I have no choice, either try or toss em. Anyway, good luck to all this time of year. At least its cooling down here now.
 

ghues

Omono
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Isn't this a little early (or much too late) to be collecting material such as this? I would think late Oct-Nov would be more appropriate and less stressful on the tree. :confused:
Mojo/Digger - Collecting yamadori this time of year in our area has been done for decades. Over the last 3 years I have been involved in it as early as mid August but this year we've waited for the late summer rains (we aslo collect until October). Collected a few last weekend so we'll see how they do. The trees put on root growth this time of year (late summer/fall) so with some good collecting techniques and immediate aftercare our survival rate is really good. To back this up I've added a couple of photos that show Mountain hemlock trees collected over the last several years (the first one is HUGE).
Good luck.

Cheers
G
 

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