Collected Elm Question--Trim New Growth?

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Hello,

I collected this Chinese Elm about three weeks ago and it has put out a ton of growth. The tree has a decently sized trunk (just under 5" at the base) and I managed to pull up a good number of the finer roots but did have to cut a huge taproot. My goal is to begin forming branches and adding a little more interest to the tree. I am wondering if it is best just to let it grow unbothered for a while or to trim back some of the buds and branches I don't ultimately want on the basis of them using resources the desired branches could use. My plan was to just let it recover but I didn't expect it grow back so strongly.

I'm new to the forum (first post) but have absolutely benefitted from reading through the threads. So much knowledge here.

Thanks!
 

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Zach Smith

Omono
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I wouldn't do anything to it at this time of year, just let it make some roots and get as established as possible before the cold weather arrives. Next year you can have a great time with it. Chinese elms are very cold tolerant, but with the roots as fresh as yours are I'd be sure to protect the tree if temps get below about 25F.
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
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Welcome to the site! I would not touch the tree until the spring. Let it recover and let the foliage harden and the roots fill in. In the spring it will hopefully be strong enough to handle anything you throw at it!
 

sorce

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Welcome to Crazy!

Why Chinese Elm?

Nice.

Sorce
 
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Welcome to Crazy!

Why Chinese Elm?

Nice.

Sorce
There are a lot of volunteer elms in my neighborhood, asked around and pulled some unwanted trees. Elms seem pretty resilient so I thought they would be fun and easy to start with.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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There are a lot of volunteer elms in my neighborhood, asked around and pulled some unwanted trees. Elms seem pretty resilient so I thought they would be fun and easy to start with.

Sorry I meant why "Chinese Elm"?
Or, how do you know/why do you think it's a Chinese Elm?

That just seems like a dick way to ask, especially since I don't know myself.

I just figured it would be more native, less Chinese.

Sorce
 
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Sorry I meant why "Chinese Elm"?
Or, how do you know/why do you think it's a Chinese Elm?

That just seems like a dick way to ask, especially since I don't know myself.

I just figured it would be more native, less Chinese.

Sorce

Its sold by landscaping nurseries here as a lacebark elm, its not native but it grows pretty well here. Seems to proliferate vigorously as the large, intentionally planted trees are all surrounded by volunteers. As far as I can tell a lacebark elm and the Chinese elm are both Ulmus parvifolia but it seems to be referred to as a Chinese elm in the bonsai community and lacebark by landscapers. I could absolutely be wrong though. This tree was collected five feet from the canopy of a massive lacebark elm.
 
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Let it grow, let it grow, let it grow. as others have said, you want and need the pot filled with roots, removing any foliage hinders that effort.
 

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