Collected (rescued) Pinus Resinosa

Brad in GR

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Via Facebook marketplace, saw a post for logging/clear cutting of 2 acres nearby of Red Pine (Pinus resinosa). While I already have 2 collected from this spring, figured I ought to ask if there were any rescue-able candidates. Permission granted before clear cutting in a few weeks. Grabbed one.

Was about 7-8 feet tall, cut back to get into my car. While the movement isn’t great, I think the girth is final enough for what I’d like to do. Open to suggestions on styling long term.

Still some direct sun is my plan for aftercare, keep moist not wet, etc. - tree was on the edge of the field and only receiving afternoon sun so I figure similar amount will be okay, maybe a bit extra shade.

One little low growth branch.

My rationalization was - this tree will be killed, so I might as well take it.

Thoughts, criticism, as always, all welcome. Thanks. My research here says fall collecting for pine/spruce is manageable.
 

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0soyoung

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As an horticultural exercise, I think it too bad that you only got one. A pair that you could compare against the spring pair would have been better, but no biggie. I am an advocate for 'repotting' conifers after the year's new growth has hardened which generally means after the summer solstice.


👍
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Hello Brad,
You should be okay. P. resinosa is very cold hardy, mostly native to areas north of you, and very sparse in distribution south of you. I would go ahead and keep it in part shade for the remainder of 2019. But in spring, if it is still green, move it to a spot with sunrise to sunset full sun. P. resinosa is a first stage of succession colonizer. They sprout after clear cuts and intense burns where the canopy is completely destroyed. Notice the long internodes between whorls of branches, this is to get the top of the tree above surrounding foliage as fast as possible. You will be battling this trait as you try to train it.

It is a pine adapted to long cold winters and short summers, it is a single flush 2 needle pine, you should treat it like a Scotts pine or a Mugo pine. It is probably most like P. sylvestris, but it does not back bud as easily. But otherwise, if you give it enough sun, it should be easy to grow. It can grow in pure Michigan sand dune sand, so use a mostly mineral soil, all pumice, or pumice, lava and a handful of bark. should work.

Your entire tree will probably come from one of the branches in the first whorl of branches. It will need to establish for a year or two, so basically noting to do but water it until spring or summer 2021. Lets see photos then. Or bring it by my farm and we can look at it together.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I do love the reddish plated bark on these, they have a lot more red than a Ponderosa. Needles will reduce with ramification, but like Ponderosa, they will not develop a very fine ramification, so you will always be a little annoyed by the long needles. But the red bark makes up for it.
 

Sansui

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Hi Leo, Thanks for sharing your expertise with pinus resinosa! I bought about 25 sapling plugs last year from Holly Hill Nurseries in Bethlehem, PA. They were deeply discounted and bound for the dumpster if they did not sell so I bought them. They also sell Scots pine, Pitch pine and a variety of spruces and firs for those who may be interested. I intend to plant a few red pines in my backyard and develop a few more for bonsai, leaving a bunch left over.

If there is anyone in my immediate area (Lower Bucks County, PA) who would like them, please let me know.
 

Brad in GR

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Hello Brad,
You should be okay. P. resinosa is very cold hardy, mostly native to areas north of you, and very sparse in distribution south of you. I would go ahead and keep it in part shade for the remainder of 2019. But in spring, if it is still green, move it to a spot with sunrise to sunset full sun. P. resinosa is a first stage of succession colonizer. They sprout after clear cuts and intense burns where the canopy is completely destroyed. Notice the long internodes between whorls of branches, this is to get the top of the tree above surrounding foliage as fast as possible. You will be battling this trait as you try to train it.

It is a pine adapted to long cold winters and short summers, it is a single flush 2 needle pine, you should treat it like a Scotts pine or a Mugo pine. It is probably most like P. sylvestris, but it does not back bud as easily. But otherwise, if you give it enough sun, it should be easy to grow. It can grow in pure Michigan sand dune sand, so use a mostly mineral soil, all pumice, or pumice, lava and a handful of bark. should work.

Your entire tree will probably come from one of the branches in the first whorl of branches. It will need to establish for a year or two, so basically noting to do but water it until spring or summer 2021. Lets see photos then. Or bring it by my farm and we can look at it together.
Awesome stuff Leo. Yes, we will have to bring it out to the farm!

My two smaller collected red pines are extremely healthy from this spring. I have even noticed two back buds that have formed on the smaller one. I have noticed improvement in the foliage - thicker and more lush. Shot of one of them attached.

Will be pruning/branch selection and wiring for next spring on the original two, and plan to put into the ground at the end of year 2. (Spring 2021).

For this one, summer 2021 into ground perhaps.

Thank you for all of the expertise and context!
 

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Leo in N E Illinois

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With the smaller ones, until the trunk reaches the diameter desired, the more branches you keep, the quicker the increase in trunk diameter. So pruning will slow development.
It does look like you have a lot of branches, so some selection might not slow development much.
 
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