Collected/saved cedar elm with few fine roots - need advise

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I Have several cedar elms that were about to be bulldozed so I collected them on the spot. As expected there are very few fine roots. I am thinking they are suckers from a larger nearby larger tree. I had to sever a large root they grew from that was at least as wide as the trunks. I soaked them in a bucket of water for several hours then potted in a 50/50 mix of sphagnum peat and coarse decomposed granite.
I plan on misting daily to keep them from drying out. Anything else I can do to help them survive other then wait till spring to see if they bud out?
 

dpowell

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I would keep them out of sun & wind, and try to keep them from moving around in the pots as much as possible. You don't want the plants to start shifting around as they start to put out new roots.
 
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Thanks! I have them up between the house and nearby fence so the wind will not be a problem. There is a big tree overhead for mostly shade.
 

Dave Leppo

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"I Have several cedar elms that were about to be bulldozed so I collected them on the spot"

If they don't make it, your only loss is your time.
 

Stan Kengai

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What you have done, more or less, is taken large hardwood cuttings. I would suggest applying a solution of IBA rooting hormone now, before the cuts have a chance to callus. (I can't find any data on IBA concentrations for hardwood cuttings, but softwood and semi-hardwood cuttings apparently do best in 0.4% and 0.6% respectively. I know hardwood would require a higher concentration, so perhaps a 1.0% solution. Others may be able to help you more there.) Keep the soil moist until spring, and at bud break, apply another solution of IBA rooting hormone, to ensure uptake.
 

rockm

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Above all, keep them from being frozen and frost-even in Texas. Even a short cold snap will kill these stumps outright if they are left unprotected. I'd suggest either heavily mulching the pots, or sinking them into the ground until that danger has passed. You also have to make sure the pots drain extremely well.
I would not mist them. It's not necessary. They are not using water. I'd just keep the soil moist--not soggy.Misting can leave soil very, very wet in winter, as the trees aren't using the water. Rainfall can make things worse.
 

Mike423

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It would probably also help to give them the 'dome' treatment. this can be done easily and cheaply by placing clear plastic bags over them (clear garbage bags work) and using anything including training wire if needed to make the frame inside the bag to keep it from resting on the tree. This will ensure that the area encapsulating the tree will retain a humid environment. I have used this technique twice on rooting large cuttings as well as rehabilitation for trees on the edge of existence and its always worked for me. Just make sure to keep them in a location where they will be in strong indirect light and the heat dose not rise too much in the bag (which shouldn't be a problem this time of year) and you should hopefully have some new roots growing.

Good luck

-Mike
 
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Wow guys! I learned more from this post then hours worth of searching! I added the rooting hormone and have the in really well draining pots today. Working on some domes now. Would it be ok to put the several pots all under 1 dome instead of an individual dome?
 

rockm

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I would be very cautious about the dome method in your area (I presume it's Texas). They may retain too much heat and humidity--which will lead to fungal and mold problems. If these were mine, I put them in the garage and just check to make sure their soil is just moist.

I've collected cedar elm out of season before in late autumn in Texas. The tree I collected was five inches in diameter and was dug with very little fibrous root. I shipped the tree back to my home in Va. via air freight and put it in a pot with just bonsai soil-no rooting hormone (which IMO, really doesn't work that well on cut roots-but is meant for air layers on upper parts of trees). I mulched the stump and pot under 8 inches of mulch on the ground in my backyard in No. Va. until the spring. I pulled it out at the end of March and left it untouched. It didn't show signs of growth until late June, but after it got going, it was fine. Unfortunately, I lost it after eight years to a late deep freeze here.

Cedar elm is very tough. It doesn't appreciate coddling.
 
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rockm - there is alot of hope for my little trees in your post. Thanks. Texans don't like codling!

I have a greenhouse for my tropicals sitting right next to these elms. Maybe I can put them in there when it gets super cold.
 

rockm

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This is how you collect cedar elm--note the size and amount of chop--top and bottom that is possible. Basically you top chop, bareroot, and cut 90 percent of thee roots off all at the same time. Get it into bonsai soil and a smallish container as possible. Wait for spring...

http://ibonsaiclub.forumotion.com/t8798-my-urban-yamadori-cedar-elm
 

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