Collecting Natal Plum (Carissa) Yardadori

ZombieNick

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My parents are landscaping their front and intend to remove all of the shrubs that have been there for the last 40 years or so. They have several large Natal Plums I would love to try to save, but I haven't been able to find much information on the species as bonsai. They are shaped as waist high hedges now and would need to be chopped pretty hard. I would prefer to air layer them, but do not know if I will have enough time (or if they take well to air layering). At least one looks like it would be worth collecting, but id likely have to do it out of season. Am I wasting my time on these? Any information or insights would be greatly appreciated.

I can get better pictures next time I'm over there:

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Carol 83

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I have a couple in pots, but have no idea about digging those monsters out.
 

Potawatomi13

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A wonderful prospective Bonsai but is not Yamadori when dug from yard!
Can parents not wait for proper replant season before destroying these?

Waist high not that big once excess branches/foliage removed. Just be aware not to remove too much at replanting time. Whenever that is;).
Perhaps visit local landscaping nursery to see about best season and technique?
 
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Forsoothe!

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I wouldn't worry about season, the larger problem being the size of the rootball that has to be accommodated. Aiming to keep the smallest individuals is your best bet. If you want two, then dig up #3 smallest to get an idea of what root mass you'll be dealing with, and observe the basic rule of reducing large anchor roots in favor of keeping as much of the tiny, hair-like feeder roots as possible.
 

BrianBay9

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If you have time I would chop hard and let them recover while in the ground. Then dig. I'm told they're easy to propagate so I'm betting you'll do well with your dig.
 

Ruddigger

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Its cooling off starting next week, Nick. You can probably get away with digging then. As long as we dont get anymore spikes.
 

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