Colorado’s Ceramics

Colorado

Omono
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I recently dove into ceramics. I am quickly falling in love with the work!

I am focusing on slab building. I am starting with unglazed rectangles. I am looking forward to progressing to ovals, hexagons, and mokkos. But first I need to learn the fundamentals.

Here are my first two containers. I don’t have a kiln so once they finish drying I’ll need to find a place to fire them. Advice and/or critiques welcome! @Pitoon @sorce @HorseloverFat

#1
52CD7937-004A-4D28-9F0A-4C01D26F099D.jpeg

#2
D771BFE8-57B3-4BC6-8471-E7578BD3EE7B.jpeg
 

HorseloverFat

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fundamentals.
I’d say your fundamentals are looking lovely!

Those are two “ceramic vessels” i’d be glad to stuff plants into!

You’ll find out alot more about your structural building technique AFTER you see your pieces.. um “taken to climax 🤣🤣”, as I phrased to Sorce a while ago..

I’d have to REACH for advice/criticisms at this point.. buuut just remember, it’s not done til it’s hot... my “process” of post-leather THROUGH bone dry is long.. many “passes” through, trying to attain edge fluidity and continuity throughout (WHEN applicable.. in “clean” situations) it’s something I still struggle with and ALWAYS am “flexing those muscles”... but something that makes ALL the difference.

I like your idea of focusing here.. till you are comfortable.. then pushing slowly outward. You’ll reach a point where you want to try... well EVERYTHING.. i strongly recommend it (once comfy). because beefing up your knowledge of unfamiliar techniques and adapting yourself to new, interesting learning curves will expand your “home range”.

Get yourself some leather scraps for that “Post-leather through bone dry” phase.. it’s a game changer.

Overall, like I said, your pieces look lovely... WAY better than ALL of my first stuff.

🤓
 

HorseloverFat

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Now I LOVE a good “tops-down” picture...

But can i see them with their bottoms... down.. like... the inside, and the tops of those lips..

😳

...whoops.. that second one was unintentional.. I’m really sorry!

🤣🤣🤣
 

HorseloverFat

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(Also.. SUPER honored that you “summoned” me here for this reason)
🤓
 

Colorado

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Now I LOVE a good “tops-down” picture...

But can i see them with their bottoms... down.. like... the inside, and the tops of those lips..

😳

...whoops.. that second one was unintentional.. I’m really sorry!

🤣🤣🤣

Thanks for the kind words.

Hm, good point! The insides! The inside definitely could use some work on the joints. I think I got a little better between #1 and #2 though…

#1
C39709D8-3D46-47B0-9AFF-F2A14676820C.jpeg

#2
B34F15AC-FB4A-4D7C-A683-C5846D431685.jpeg
 

Carol 83

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Really nice for just starting out. Do you make the holes for the tie down wires later?
 

Carol 83

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Thanks! I don’t have the appropriate tool to make the small holes properly, yet. So since these are shohin-sized, I figured the two large holes will suffice for now.
Still, nice job, I like the feet. So nice to have so many promising potters here.
 

Colorado

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If you want a smooth transition from lip to sides get a round rib or something and use that to smooth it out. You can do the same for the inside. It smooths out the seam.

Thanks for the tip! I was just checking out your thread. You are making some great pots!

I have some tools I have been trying to use for that purpose, but I think need a slightly different shape. I will follow your advice and try to find a rib that works better.
 

mwar15

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Thanks for the tip! I was just checking out your thread. You are making some great pots!

I have some tools I have been trying to use for that purpose, but I think need a slightly different shape. I will follow your advice and try to find a rib that works better.
If videos were easier to post I would post them. I’ll take some photos tomorrow for you
 

sorce

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A credit card can be cut into the shape of a finishing rib quite easily, I think that's a @ABCarve wisdom.

The American diagonal cut pipe like "hole cutters" are subpar to the Japanese which are v cut, but I find a regular old drill bit to work even better than both. (If cut on a flat supporting surface anyway)

Nice, I first though "cool, another pot making thread", then I feared it was just a collection of ceramics, then I was like "eff yeah, a pot making thread!"

Sorce
 

Pitoon

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I am focusing on slab building. I am starting with unglazed rectangles. I am looking forward to progressing to ovals, hexagons, and mokkos. But first I need to learn the fundamentals.

Here are my first two containers. I don’t have a kiln so once they finish drying I’ll need to find a place to fire them. Advice and/or critiques welcome! @Pitoon @sorce @HorseloverFat
I may not be the best person to discuss slab built pots with. @mwar15 @sorce @ABCarve would be the potters that work with that method from what I have seen here. What I can say though is that proportions is the key to making a pot. Pots that are not in proportion may be fully functional, but may not be aesthetically pleasing to the eye. Also I suggest you join a pottery studio or at least take some hand building classes to get access to a kiln. The reason I say this is because most all pottery studios will not fire pottery that is not made with clay that is not purchased from their studio.

My critique.......you should provide top, side, and bottom views along with something that can give as a judgement on size. Looking at your pics I have no way to understand the size of the pot unless you provide measurements. Even with measurements I would have to pull out a tape measure or ruler to look at. Simply adding say a pencil in the picture I can immediately understand the size of the pot. I like the design. The length x width seems appropriate, I can't say about the height as there isn't a side view pic. You need to work on your seams. Ensure they are joined properly as seams can open during the firing process. If your clay has grog pay attention when smoothing out the pot especially when using a sponge.

Your drainage holes look excessively large for that size of pot. I would make them smaller and add wire holes near each corner. Since you mentioned these pots will be unglazed everything you leave on the pot will show. So unless you are wanting a specific look always keep that in mind, glaze can help "hide" imperfections. Dry slow to prevent warping and cracks.

What Cone does this clay mature at? Absorption rate? Shrinkage rate?

I don’t have the appropriate tool to make the small holes properly, yet. So since these are shohin-sized, I figured the two large holes will suffice for now.
Poke a hole with a pin tool or long nail, then enlarge the hole with a drill bit to the desired size when the clay is leather hard.
 

HorseloverFat

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I may not be the best person to discuss slab built pots with. @mwar15 @sorce @ABCarve would be the potters that work with that method from what I have seen here. What I can say though is that proportions is the key to making a pot. Pots that are not in proportion may be fully functional, but may not be aesthetically pleasing to the eye. Also I suggest you join a pottery studio or at least take some hand building classes to get access to a kiln. The reason I say this is because most all pottery studios will not fire pottery that is not made with clay that is not purchased from their studio.

My critique.......you should provide top, side, and bottom views along with something that can give as a judgement on size. Looking at your pics I have no way to understand the size of the pot unless you provide measurements. Even with measurements I would have to pull out a tape measure or ruler to look at. Simply adding say a pencil in the picture I can immediately understand the size of the pot. I like the design. The length x width seems appropriate, I can't say about the height as there isn't a side view pic. You need to work on your seams. Ensure they are joined properly as seams can open during the firing process. If your clay has grog pay attention when smoothing out the pot especially when using a sponge.

Your drainage holes look excessively large for that size of pot. I would make them smaller and add wire holes near each corner. Since you mentioned these pots will be unglazed everything you leave on the pot will show. So unless you are wanting a specific look always keep that in mind, glaze can help "hide" imperfections. Dry slow to prevent warping and cracks.

What Cone does this clay mature at? Absorption rate? Shrinkage rate?


Poke a hole with a pin tool or long nail, then enlarge the hole with a drill bit to the desired size when the clay is leather hard.
Does no one use the “flesh piercing” method to make holes...Am i doing it wrong?


Hollow-point needle.. scaled up... 🤣 dignified cookie cutter! 🤣🤣

These are some of
my hole tools.B778D583-4264-4E4E-B096-C2DDD5317A1D.jpeg
 

Pitoon

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Does no one use the “flesh piercing” method to make holes...Am i doing it wrong?


Hollow-point needle.. scaled up... 🤣 dignified cookie cutter! 🤣🤣

These are some of
my hole tools.View attachment 414720
I used to use assorted sized hole cutters pressing right through the clay. I have since changed my method because I don't like how the hole cutter can sometimes distort the pot bottom. I now solely use a lace tool to make my holes while the pot is on the wheel.
 

HorseloverFat

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I used to use assorted sized hole cutters pressing right through the clay. I have since changed my method because I don't like how the hole cutter can sometimes distort the pot bottom. I now solely use a lace tool to make my holes while the pot is on the wheel.
Groovy!
 

Pitoon

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@Colorado I forgot to mention...... If you get pottery tools, try to invest on some decent ones. Not the Chinese junk you find on Ebay or Amazon. Kemper tools are really nice and have an edge on them. It makes working with clay so much easier.
 

sorce

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some of
my hole tools.

I dig it, though I like stiff ones with a through to punch out slugs from the other side.

Finally found me one of those, what I thought were "blunt tubes", that turned out to actually be some kinda vape thing container, but it should work quite well, for my smaller round stuff.

I like the look of that shiny one you got.

Sorce
 

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