Dawn Redwood material - opine at will!

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18
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18
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
USDA Zone
6a
#1
So I went to my first show at Meijer Gardens today. I spent three hours looking at everything and biding my time. But this dawn... it’s massive, healthy, gnarly and I like the carving as an option... and the root base is quite nice imo. So I gave in. I don’t regret it for a minute.

With that said, I know I won’t be touching it this year - there is plenty of time for decision making.

But this is now the most mature (or largest mass at least) piece of material I own. I see multiple options... and I’m nervous! It’s such a lovely piece and Dawn Redwood is my favorite tree (3 in my yard already):

1. Using the carved wood as primary part of the movement, aligns well with the root base down and to the right (top left apex, bottom right roots angle)

2. Backside where no carving is visible, don’t love nebari potential as much though

3. Partial deadwood rotated / variants of this

I lost Internet for the week due to some landscaping work, otherwise I’d touch up the photos with my ideas.

Would love to hear some opinions and ideas. Cheers.
 

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Punky

Seedling
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5
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4
#2
That’s really cool. I don’t really have any ideas for you, but I wanted to let you know that I can’t wait to see where you go with this.
 
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1,559
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1,272
Location
Michigan. 6a
USDA Zone
6a
#5
Very nice! Excellent choice.....the tree has a lot of terrific character to work with. I would also let the tree adjust for this season to your care and climate and limit the fiddling and chopping. I particularly like this photo view you attached....it shows a gentle upward movement and showcases the environmental struggle with the curving lower carved area that pushes upward in the opposite direction of the leader at the top. In my mind this stacked and staggered carving nicely balances the tree providing a solid anchor to the ground. During the upcoming season the carving should lose its new-feeling and take on a nice darker aged tone. The tree has an interesting deciduous quality that is somewhat concealing it’s majestic Dawn Redwood background. I happen to like that creative quality you’ve brought about.

Possibly this spring...or the next...I’d remove that smaller root that overlaps, crosses over, that large root at the lower front....before it creates a defined indentation in the large root below.

Ha! You have a lot of nifty lawn flowers. A nice contrast color that compliments the tree.
862CEB24-D306-4BA7-8948-67C3056A3428.jpeg
 
Messages
18
Likes
18
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
USDA Zone
6a
#6
Very nice! Excellent choice.....the tree has a lot of terrific character to work with. I would also let the tree adjust for this season to your care and climate and limit the fiddling and chopping. I particularly like this photo view you attached....it shows a gentle upward movement and showcases the environmental struggle with the curving lower carved area that pushes upward in the opposite direction of the leader at the top. In my mind this stacked and staggered carving nicely balances the tree providing a solid anchor to the ground. During the upcoming season the carving should lose its new-feeling and take on a nice darker aged tone. The tree has an interesting deciduous quality that is somewhat concealing it’s majestic Dawn Redwood background. I happen to like that creative quality you’ve brought about.

Possibly this spring...or the next...I’d remove that smaller root that overlaps, crosses over, that large root at the lower front....before it creates a defined indentation in the large root below.

Ha! You have a lot of nifty lawn flowers. A nice contrast color that compliments the tree.
View attachment 242623

Many thanks for the guidance! No experience with carving (done by the nursery, I'd be too nervous on this large a piece of material yet) so thank you for the words on maturation of that wood. I do like the lines you've pointed out.

My yard-grown dawns (one 15 years and 20 feet tall) tend to have those curving-back-towards-the-trunk / overlap roots often. While it can aesthetically be interesting, I think you're saying that will ensure expansion of that larger root below?

Certainly will not be touching it this year. The tree has been in the pot for 2 years, so I may debate a simple anti-trauma re-pot to a larger option next spring for slightly more room to expand the roots.

It's already pushing a ton of foliage in only 1 week, even compared to this photo... easily the jewel of my young collection.
 

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