Deadwood Chinese larch

Keith m

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Does any one have experience with deadwooding the top of a larch sorta going for the lightening strike look. Is that possible with these trees they are not very common where I live.
 

Keith m

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I think that's the answer I was looking for
 

Tycoss

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Just look up larch bonsai online, or even on this site. All sorts of deadwood work is possible with them.
 

Keith m

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Just look up larch bonsai online, or even on this site. All sorts of deadwood work is possible with them.
I have poked around through pictures and literature. I'm wondering since it's a conifer that sheds it's needles if it would be like a Mable that would just she'd or drop off any Deadwood. Or just cover it up. Maybe that is something I would just deal with in the future.
 

Keith m

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Also wondering the best time to do this work on this particular species.
 

defra

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i believe now is the right time

anyone: right me if im wrong :

its said that now the wound heals slower when not growing and it Will look better than when it does grow and heals quicker.
 

Keith m

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This is what I'm working with... I will be knocking off the top right b4 that big curve the previous owner put into it...
 

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wireme

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I have poked around through pictures and literature. I'm wondering since it's a conifer that sheds it's needles if it would be like a Mable that would just she'd or drop off any Deadwood. Or just cover it up. Maybe that is something I would just deal with in the future.
Some deciduous species have very good decay resistance actually and some conifers poor. Different information sources list thing differently of course and sapwood ratings might be different than heartwood. This is the first chart I googled up just now, others will differ. Western larch here is generally considered a pretty good wood for outside use, decent decay resistance. image.jpg
 

wireme

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There's a handy little chart
I guess there are other things to consider when deciding if deadwood is suitable for a tree/species but looking up the decay resistance can help give an idea how long it might last if it's deemed an asset to the tree.
 

Giga

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Some deciduous species have very good decay resistance actually and some conifers poor. Different information sources list thing differently of course and sapwood ratings might be different than heartwood. This is the first chart I googled up just now, others will differ. Western larch here is generally considered a pretty good wood for outside use, decent decay resistance. View attachment 129259
thats a cool chart as I have black cherry and red mullberry - I was debating how long dead wood would:D last
 

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