Deciduous Autumn Trimming

my nellie

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#21
A study published in the journal PLOS One (Published online 2013 Sep 16) : A randomised Couble-Blind Placebo Controlled Crossover Trial

Conclusions
The overall findings of this trial indicate that magnetic wrist straps, and also copper bracelets, have no statistically significant, nor clinically meaningful, therapeutic effects upon rheumatoid arthritis. The devices worn in this trial offered little if no specific benefits, i.e. beyond those of a placebo, in reducing pain, inflammation, disability, disease activity, and medication use amongst this patient group.
 
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#22
A study published in the journal PLOS One (Published online 2013 Sep 16) : A randomised Couble-Blind Placebo Controlled Crossover Trial

Conclusions
The overall findings of this trial indicate that magnetic wrist straps, and also copper bracelets, have no statistically significant, nor clinically meaningful, therapeutic effects upon rheumatoid arthritis. The devices worn in this trial offered little if no specific benefits, i.e. beyond those of a placebo, in reducing pain, inflammation, disability, disease activity, and medication use amongst this patient group.
It will give you a green wrist though!
 

just.wing.it

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#23
A study published in the journal PLOS One (Published online 2013 Sep 16) : A randomised Couble-Blind Placebo Controlled Crossover Trial

Conclusions
The overall findings of this trial indicate that magnetic wrist straps, and also copper bracelets, have no statistically significant, nor clinically meaningful, therapeutic effects upon rheumatoid arthritis. The devices worn in this trial offered little if no specific benefits, i.e. beyond those of a placebo, in reducing pain, inflammation, disability, disease activity, and medication use amongst this patient group.
Do they say that the placebo worked for anyone?....
When placebos work, and in the end the patient is aware but doesn't care....I find those cases very interesting.
 

ralf

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#24
this is also a good time to wire most deciduous - thin branches are pliable now (generally speaking) and will 'lignify' by spring.
Living in 7a zone I have heard many times that there is no sence to wire just for winter as there is no lignification. Is there any chart/paper showing the rate of lignin formation during the year based on a temperature?
 

0soyoung

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#25
Living in 7a zone I have heard many times that there is no sence to wire just for winter as there is no lignification. Is there any chart/paper showing the rate of lignin formation during the year based on a temperature?
Likely there is, but I am not in touch with this data.
The process almost certainly involves enzymes. Enzymatic reactions monotonically increase with temperature (though they may saturate at high temperatures). So, I expect the rate of hardening is lower, the lower the temperature.

We should also note that when I/we say 'lignify' in this context, we are really just referring to how flexible a stem is and its becoming rigid, which doesn't necessarily relate to lignin content (but maybe it does). There likely are some openly available tabulations (i.e., not behind a paywall) of lignin content in various species - lignin is junk to paper pulp makers. As I recall, poplar is a fav for pulping, for example. Maples, especially acer palmatum, would be an interesting contrast to see if this notion holds up, in lieu of finding chart/papers that address the matter more globally, to answer your question.
 
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#26
@0soyoung there is definitely something happening in colder temperatures: my summinagashi and red dragon (the only trees not in my cold frame) are much less flexible now in the 1C to +4C (33-39F) range than they were a month ago. Reminds me of how chicken soup goes stiff in the fridge, even above freezing temperature

Likewise, this is also a good time to wire most deciduous - thin branches are pliable now (generally speaking) and will 'lignify' by spring. Then, you can remove the wire and do some 'clean up' pruning before leaves are out.
question - you don't find that the wire bites into your branches in the fall since this is when branches thicken significantly? Or do you only wire branches that will need to grow out so much that any marks from the wiring won't be visible?

Thank you
D
 
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#27
Fall is prime time for me to prune all deciduous. I try to do it within 3 weeks after leaf falls. First trees a week ago, most done beginning of december. Average first frost date is 17 november here.
 
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#28
As a 63 year old arthritis sufferer in both elbows, I can tell you that after about three years of doctor visits and drugs, nothing worked. Guy told me to try the copper. I did. Can’t make It without it now. Did the trick. Took them off for a week just to make sure and lie and behold it was back within that week. Put the copper back on and whammo, pain gone.

Do what you want but I swear by this shit. There’s a reason the Greeks and Romans wore copper around their arms, now I know why.
View attachment 216304 View attachment 216305
I can see bonsai people wiring themselves now.
 

0soyoung

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#29
@0soyoung there is definitely something happening in colder temperatures: my summinagashi and red dragon (the only trees not in my cold frame) are much less flexible now in the 1C to +4C (33-39F) range than they were a month ago. Reminds me of how chicken soup goes stiff in the fridge, even above freezing temperature
I've noticed similar things too, but not in the detail you have. I'm not sure why, though.

question - you don't find that the wire bites into your branches in the fall since this is when branches thicken significantly? Or do you only wire branches that will need to grow out so much that any marks from the wiring won't be visible?
No marks from wire left on over winter, but lots of marks from wire I put on during the season.

Stems really don't thicken much, if at all, over the winter. I've measured this and it is just like I reported in my repotting experiments of old - see Zelkova repotting experiment, for example.
 
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#37
Maybe we could get a few copper headbands for those of us suffering from arthritis of the brain. I feel that I could be said to have this problem at least several times a day.
 

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