Direction for a tree in a pot?

TyroTinker

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OK so I've had this tree for about 11-12 years and I know it's not a bonsai it's just a tree, because I've never done anything with it besides occasionally water it.
It started itself from seed falling from a maple in the front yard to a flower pot in the back at my folks place. I've been watching it ever since.

I would like to do something with this tree but I don't have any idea what. I was hoping to do something unique (less traditional) with it because this seems to be a unique tree seeing as it is over a decade old and still so small. I'm thinking I don't need it to be thickened up like a traditional bonsai because I kind of like the look of it being size it is (width)
Does anyone have any ideas on what to do to it that might fit this tree the way it is?
Or if I should just get over it and just put it in the ground..?
IMG_5443.JPG IMG_5444.JPG IMG_5445.JPG
 

f1pt4

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Also I'm not 100% sure but I think it is a Norway maple... they also come in red right?

I believe you are right. It most likely is a Norway Maple. Leaves don't reduce much in size. Not a particular favorite as far as bonsai is concerned. IMO if you should pursue this tree, you need to let it grow and get thick in order to make it remotely believable/in scale to a bonsai?

There's a lot of die back on them as they mature. City chops them down all the time. Raccoons and squirrels like them for nesting and as launching pads for peoples roofs.

It's that small because it's been in a pot. Plant it in the ground and you'll see what happens.

But hey... go for it, have fun with it, just make sure to get some more species that have better leaf reduction and have more potential as a bonsai... for your own sake.
 

TyroTinker

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I believe you are right. It most likely is a Norway Maple. Leaves don't reduce much in size. Not a particular favorite as far as bonsai is concerned. IMO if you should pursue this tree, you need to let it grow and get thick in order to make it remotely believable/in scale to a bonsai?

There's a lot of die back on them as they mature. City chops them down all the time. Raccoons and squirrels like them for nesting and as launching pads for peoples roofs.

It's that small because it's been in a pot. Plant it in the ground and you'll see what happens.

But hey... go for it, have fun with it, just make sure to get some more species that have better leaf reduction and have more potential as a bonsai... for your own sake.
That's what I was afraid of. I might just leave it like it is. I have always just liked it because it started itself in a pot and survived. My hope is to take some maple airlayers next spring. I have a couple options I can take from next year. I would also like to buy a trident or two.
Thanks for the insight
 

0soyoung

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It does look a lot like a 'Crimson King' Norway maple (acer platanoides). I think they are tremendous fun!
Leaf size reduces dramatically in small pots. After a while, they just settle in to being small trees.
Get it into a small pot, chop it down to the lowest node next spring, and start having some fun with it!



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TyroTinker

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Yeah that looks like the full size leaf. Is that a common one in your area? I live about 30 min from the anacortes exit off I-5 (south of you) so if it's common for you it is definitely the same tree.
Thanks, I might just do something with it after all
 

0soyoung

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I think acer plantanoides are common in this area. In my case, there are two 30 ft tall Crimson King Norway maples right across the street. There are ubiquitous Douglas firs right across the street too. Among other things, I amuse myself growing volunteer seedlings I find growing in my yard each spring.
 

TyroTinker

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That sounds like fun. That's how I got some of my starter materials. If I can keep that alive I'm one step closer to being able to care for a more developed tree :)
 

Giga

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Hey, I have 4 red maples and I think they are amazing - I'm all about local species
 

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