Do JBP backbud easily

Nishant

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Hello All, Just wanted to know if the JBP backbud easily. I don't have any JBP but I was wondering that if the JBP have multiple flush, do they back-bud profusely as well?
 

Nishant

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So why then are other pine species are used at all? Do JBP have serious weather limitations?
 

leatherback

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So why then are other pine species are used at all? Do JBP have serious weather limitations?
Why not?

In your reasoning there would be no reason other the number of flushes, backbudding and weather tolerance to grow a specific species?
If that were true, why are all the different species of maples used? And all the different species of juniper?
 

Nishant

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With the other pine species that don’t back bud, developing a bonsai becomes so much more difficult.

While different maples have different leaf shake and color, with pines there isn’t so much variation?
 

leatherback

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With the other pine species that don’t back bud
hm.. Not really a pine person myself. That being said.. I know that P. Sylvestris and P. Mugo both backbud really well. And to me they look quite different in color and density / toughness. And of course.. You can get yamadori from those, whereas from JBP that might be a little more dificult..
 
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With the other pine species that don’t back bud, developing a bonsai becomes so much more difficult.

While different maples have different leaf shake and color, with pines there isn’t so much variation?
So why then are other pine species are used at all? Do JBP have serious weather limitations?
It’s not that other pine species do not back bud, it’s that some species back bud more readily/easily than others. I personally like multi-flush pines (JBP and Pitch pines) because IMO they behave more predictably than single.

However, people have been making amazing bonsai from single flush trees for more than 500 years!
 

plant_dr

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There's plenty of variation! Needle color, needle length, the number if needles per fascicle, growth rate, growth habit, flexibility, hardiness, bark color, bark texture, compactness, etc. And just because other pines might not backbud quite as vigorously as a Japanese black pine doesn't mean they're garbage or that they won't do it at all. My Austrian black pine backbuds plenty for my taste. I love it and its super hardy.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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So why then are other pine species are used at all? Do JBP have serious weather limitations?
Is this a serious question? You’ve been here a couple years, a search can reveal big differences among species.
Do you know how to find the Zone Hardiness of different plant Species?
 
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So why then are other pine species are used at all? Do JBP have serious weather limitations?
I don't know about England, but here in America there are a variety of pine species used, each with their own plusses and minuses that have to be learned. If you're talking about Japanese-only species, there are three pine species that are widely used. Some species do better in slightly colder, or warmer climates. As @Brian Van Fleet said, learn the zone hardiness of your area and work with species that thrive within that zone. I think you'll find there are quite a few pine species you can work with, and back budding is not the only determining factor in choosing a species.
 

bwaynef

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I've been told jRp backbud more than jBp. I think there are some US natives that probably backbud as strongly/easily as jbp too.
 

Bonsai Nut

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From my experience, some pine species actually back bud as well or better then JBP... your mileage may vary, though.
If you want a beautiful five needle Pine with short needles that back buds readily try Bristlecone Pine.

Unfortunately it grows very slowly but it back buds like nothing I have ever seen in a pine
 

Nishant

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If you want a beautiful five needle Pine with short needles that back buds readily try Bristlecone Pine.

Unfortunately it grows very slowly but it back buds like nothing I have ever seen in a pine
Thanks for this wonderful suggestion. Just looked up. I will give it a try. Its slow growing but keeps its needles for several years.
So do the new buds not form every year? And what happens to the buds that it would throw out in profusion. Just trying to understand which stage of growth is slow. May be between bud formation and needle formation?
 

kevinlovett86

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If you want a beautiful five needle Pine with short needles that back buds readily try Bristlecone Pine.

Unfortunately it grows very slowly but it back buds like nothing I have ever seen in a pine
Just the other day somebody said (or I read somewhere) that that bristlecone are pointless for bonsai because they grow too leggy. Maybe I misunderstood something
Care to dumb it down for me a bit, please?
 

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Why don't all men marry same woman? Some of us sick of seeing same tree over and over!
 
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Potawatomi13

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Potawatomi13

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Thanks for this wonderful suggestion. Just looked up. I will give it a try. Its slow growing but keeps its needles for several years.
So do the new buds not form every year? And what happens to the buds that it would throw out in profusion. Just trying to understand which stage of growth is slow. May be between bud formation and needle formation?
Looked up Bristlecone threads/posts on BN have you:confused:? After doing same please ask remaining questions;).
 
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