Do Pines and Evergreen needs fertilizer in month of winter ? They continues to grow in pots.

Ali Raza

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Hello to everyone i am new in the group and i want to know if pines and evergreen needs fertilizer in winter season. I observed that they are continue to grow in the pots. Suggestions will be appreciated.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Photosynthesis products = fuel.
Nutrients = building blocks.

As long as there is fuel going strong, and growth happening, they need building blocks to keep growing.

So yes, fertilizing during growing seasons is a good idea.

What are the winters like in Pakistan?
 

Ali Raza

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Photosynthesis products = fuel.
Nutrients = building blocks.

As long as there is fuel going strong, and growth happening, they need building blocks to keep growing.

So yes, fertilizing during growing seasons is a good idea.

What are the winters like in Pakistan?
Short mild winter without snow with minimum temperature reaches 45 Fahrenheit.
 

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If a tree or plant is actively growing, it will utilize fertilizer. However "more" is not "better". Once nutrients are available in the soil, a tree will only absorb what it needs. Adding more nutrients will not get a tree to absorb more and grow faster or larger...

This is a long-winded way of saying: I have killed more trees by over-fertilizing than by under-fertilizing :)
 

Ali Raza

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If a tree or plant is actively growing, it will utilize fertilizer. However "more" is not "better". Once nutrients are available in the soil, a tree will only absorb what it needs. Adding more nutrients will not get a tree to absorb more and grow faster or larger...

This is a long-winded way of saying: I have killed more trees by over-fertilizing than by under-fertilizing :)
how to know that plant needs fertilizer and is not available in the soil ?
 

Bonsai Nut

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how to know that plant needs fertilizer and is not available in the soil ?

It will help us a little better to know (in general) where in Pakistan you live.

For example, Southern California is Zone 10 (in terms of USDA plant growing zone). During the winter (now) my pines and other conifers slow down and almost stop growing. They may not be fully dormant, but they are "resting". They will not start growing again until February or March. Fertilizer needs during this time are very low.

Much of Pakistan is Zone 10, or even Zone 9. But if you live in the south by the ocean (like around Karachi), it can be much warmer and is a true "tropical" environment. Trees is this area will be more likely to grow year-round.

During the growing season, I fertilize every month on the first weekend of the month (which helps me to remember to do so). In the winter, I tend to be more worried about soil pH and treating for fungus and insects (it is our rainy season).
 

Ali Raza

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It will help us a little better to know (in general) where in Pakistan you live.

For example, Southern California is Zone 10 (in terms of USDA plant growing zone). During the winter (now) my pines and other conifers slow down and almost stop growing. They may not be fully dormant, but they are "resting". They will not start growing again until February or March. Fertilizer needs during this time are very low.

Much of Pakistan is Zone 10, or even Zone 9. But if you live in the south by the ocean (like around Karachi), it can be much warmer and is a true "tropical" environment.
thank for the effort , i live in the capital city Islamabad zone 9b. I think my pine comes under two flush category. The second flush growth continue to grow with new buds so i am thinking whether they need fertilizer or not. If needed then how much needed ?
 

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Bonsai Nut

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My black pines are two-flush pines, but they do not continue to grow right now. They are done with their second flush of growth and are setting buds for the spring push of candles.

I do not know what kind of pine you have, but if it is continuing to grow, it will continue to benefit from fertilizer - as long as it doesn't build up in the soil. If you have a nice open soil mix and water flows easily through the soil, it is hard to over-fertilize because the tree absorbs what it needs, and the rest is flushed out of the soil as you water.

Organic fertilizer is "safer" than chemical fertilizer, because it is weaker and breaks down slowly into the soil. Many traditional bonsai growers use organic fertilizer balls that they leave on the top of the soil throughout the growing season. When the balls break down into the soil, they know it is time to put new balls on :)

I use chemical fertilizer that I apply once per month while my trees are growing. I try to apply 1/2 the amount that is recommended in the instructions - but I reapply every month.
 

Ali Raza

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My black pines are two-flush pines, but they do not continue to grow right now. They are done with their second flush of growth and are setting buds for the spring push of candles.

I do not know what kind of pine you have, but if it is continuing to grow, it will continue to benefit from fertilizer - as long as it doesn't build up in the soil. If you have a nice open soil mix and water flows easily through the soil, it is hard to over-fertilize because the tree absorbs what it needs, and the rest is flushed out of the soil as you water.

Organic fertilizer is "safer" than chemical fertilizer, because it is weaker and breaks down slowly into the soil. Many traditional bonsai growers use organic fertilizer balls that they leave on the top of the soil throughout the growing season. When the balls break down into the soil, they know it is time to put new balls on :)

I use chemical fertilizer that I apply once per month while my trees are growing. I try to apply 1/2 the amount that is recommended in the instructions - but I reapply every month.
thank you very much sir, mine pine is Pinus Roxburghii and i think with start of December the growth is almost halted as temperature continues to drop down. December and January are two month of peak winter. Followed by spring in the mid of February. I will keep these things in mind and will act accordingly.
 

River's Edge

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My black pines are two-flush pines, but they do not continue to grow right now. They are done with their second flush of growth and are setting buds for the spring push of candles.

I do not know what kind of pine you have, but if it is continuing to grow, it will continue to benefit from fertilizer - as long as it doesn't build up in the soil. If you have a nice open soil mix and water flows easily through the soil, it is hard to over-fertilize because the tree absorbs what it needs, and the rest is flushed out of the soil as you water.

Organic fertilizer is "safer" than chemical fertilizer, because it is weaker and breaks down slowly into the soil. Many traditional bonsai growers use organic fertilizer balls that they leave on the top of the soil throughout the growing season. When the balls break down into the soil, they know it is time to put new balls on :)

I use chemical fertilizer that I apply once per month while my trees are growing. I try to apply 1/2 the amount that is recommended in the instructions - but I reapply every month.
I also find the organic fertiliser a better choice. One aspect to consider is the stage the tree is at, During development i use fertiliser more than during refinement. If a tree has been undergoing decandling, repotting or is being prepared for grafting then i often use fertiliser later in the summer and earlier in the spring to ensure a stronger tree for the work to be done. Most bonsai techniques stress the tree and keeping it stronger is one way to help offset the extra stress. For example i apply organic fertiliser to my JBP in late february, early march if i plan on decandling them that spring. I am in zone 8b and find that the native pines continue to grow throughout the winter. My potted pines slow down for the two or three coldest months. Mid November to mid February usually!
 

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Chir Pine interesting tree. Big virtue of growing many branches out of barky areas of trunk so no shortage of selection. Fine but long needles. Pretty. Can needles be reduced in length? Time tells. Best of success and if possible please keep members here posted on progress;)?
 

Ali Raza

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Chir Pine interesting tree. Big virtue of growing many branches out of barky areas of trunk so no shortage of selection. Fine but long needles. Pretty. Can needles be reduced in length? Time tells. Best of success and if possible please keep members here posted on progress;)?
Thanks Mr. Potawatomi. Needle reduction is bit challange for these kind of long needle pines. Right now i will try to work more on ramification and shape and leave the needle reduction for the masters like you. Hope to get more tips on needle reduction when time comes till then i will be posting annual updates.
 

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