Does a Quince plant need dormancy?

j evans

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It is time to put away the plants for the winter. There is some thought that it would be nice to have one of our Quince plants in the garage. It stays about 48 - 55 in there most of the winter with modest grow lights. Any thoughts?
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Which quince? Chaenomeles? or Cydonia? Or Pseudocydonia? Flowering, European fruiting, or Chinese fruiting quince?

All are in the apple family, most are USDA zones 7 to 4, a few can get by in zone 8. There's a reason apples are not grown in southern Florida, it is too warm in winter.

If the chill requirements are not met, the new growth will either be late or won't happen. Usually 32 to 40 F is recommended as the warmest you want to try to meet chilling requirements with. You "might" be able to meet requirements with your temperatures. It might take longer, or it might not work at all. Perhaps someone from Florida or Southern California can weigh in. Given the number of Chaenomeles photos I've seen from So. California, Chaenomeles might be okay with it. Don't know about the others.
 

Paulpash

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I've always overwintered my Japanese quince outside in the UK which gets down to around a max of - 5C most seasons. Quince are very hardy from my observations - they bud out really early and their leaves never seem to get frosted.
 

rockm

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48 - 55 F is FAR FAR too warm to keep a quince dormant or satisfy its rather significant chilling requirements. It is completely safe to store it outdoors in the weather under mulch in your garden bed.

The aim of overwintering is NOT TO KEEP THE PLANT WARM. It is to provide the tree with the lowest temps necessary to fulfill its chilling hour requirement necessary for health, and to keep it from budding out too early in the spring --which can kill it.
 
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