Does this look stupid? Twin trunk live edge oval table top...

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Western West Virginia AHS heat zone 6
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6ab
#1
It may be a tad tall ATM but I still need to level the 4 contact points more.
I'm not trying to match any particular project with the stand, just create one, my 1st.
This actually stems from a previous thread I began that was going to use a stump
but I never got the wood carving chain saw. That would look cool having live edge,
sap wood, and black walnut intermingling from the same stump or block of wood.

A few years ago I harvested some local black walnut and have made good on the corbels
for my new fireplace with it. I had this oddity of a 3 way crotch and for some reason failed
to care for it. I thought I'd make a short coffee table with this, but now I'm heading in the
direction of a bonsai stand. Left in the elements, I'm now forced to remove the bark as well
as some rotten sap wood.
Most of the sap wood is in tact quite healthily, though rustic with some worm holes.
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I removed the bark with a machete yesterday and began using what tools I had to get at the sap wood, but it's pretty hard.
By evening I decided to use a 1/2-3/4" wood chisel and hammer and still have a very long way to go with the crotch and legs.
I will stain the bark on the table only, and to cover up what once grew there, be it fungus or lichen, it will blend and all colour as one
on the live edge.

I've ordered some bits for the 1/8" Dremel but that's more what I would use for carving the actual bonsai or smaller stand.
Any thoughts on tools to remove the sap wood? I think the chisel has been most effective so far.
 
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Location
Western West Virginia AHS heat zone 6
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#4
I like each separately, but not both together.
I know, something about the oblong table top paired, goes more in a furniture direction, rather than for bonsai, ya think?
Do know that the legs are going to be dark warm brown walnut when I get past the sap wood, and considerably thinner.
Probably 1" thinner on the main trunk and more variable on the legs themselves. It will pop with oil based poly.
Water based makes the walnut more milky, and destroys the warmth.
 
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Nashville TN
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7a
#5
I really like this concept. It’s inventive and thought provoking. I too agree with BVF -maybe it’s that the base is so meaty..? Perhaps it could benefit from partial removal of some of the bark tapered down flush..?

Regardless, you’re on to something
 
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689
Location
Western West Virginia AHS heat zone 6
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6ab
#7
I really like this concept. It’s inventive and thought provoking. I too agree with BVF -maybe it’s that the base is so meaty..? Perhaps it could benefit from partial removal of some of the bark tapered down flush..?

Regardless, you’re on to something
Thanks Jim.
There is no bark on the base or legs. The sap wood remains and is being chiseled off. Will take a while.
 
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Ithaca, NY
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5b
#8
Interesting pieces for sure. I think it would look better if you took the piece serving as the legs and flipped it upside down so the three prongs were attached to the bottom of the wood slab. It would look more cohesive and feel lighter and have more of an upward movement.

This could only work if you can anchor it to the ground somehow. I’m not sure if this is meant to be a semi permanent garden fixture or a display stand for shows. Could be interesting to play with that idea though.
 

TomB

Shohin
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S.E. UK
#10
The top is a nice piece of wood. I would use it as a slab without the tripod/legs arrangement. You'll end up with a much better display piece that way. You could leave the bark, though I'd probably remove it and carve some texture into the edges.
You could always carve the 'legs' into a short root stand as a separate piece.
 
Messages
963
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689
Location
Western West Virginia AHS heat zone 6
USDA Zone
6ab
#11
Interesting pieces for sure. I think it would look better if you took the piece serving as the legs and flipped it upside down so the three prongs were attached to the bottom of the wood slab. It would look more cohesive and feel lighter and have more of an upward movement.

This could only work if you can anchor it to the ground somehow. I’m not sure if this is meant to be a semi permanent garden fixture or a display stand for shows. Could be interesting to play with that idea though.
Hi Mike, great idea!
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I tried that, and it accentuates what @TN_Jim said about it being so meaty.
The legs would need a short hour glass like figure to keep wide the contact points.
My wife prefers the original feet down stool like proposal. I'm working on it ;)
No this won't be an outdoor fixture, rather an indoor multi-purpose piece I think...
...if'n she takes to it. I figure she will, albeit too short for an indoor purpose I believe,
it will still be unique, and attractive.
 
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689
Location
Western West Virginia AHS heat zone 6
USDA Zone
6ab
#13
I love it. I think it looks best in it's original form.
I love rustic log furniture though.
Thanks. I appreciate all different thoughts and ideas. I've never done this before.

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Same tree, different slab, looks like a freek'n stool.
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The bottom side is presenting (my negligence in care mostly) quite the challenge.
This is obviously the contact points with the ground, not dirt, for the longest time.
Won't know till I get deeper how much rot is going to dictate how the carving goes,
but the picture in post 11 my last post, some of the heartwood is coming into focus on the tripod.
It's a different sense of pride using a hammer and chisel to explore. God I need a new chisel :eek:
But, there's a ball of burl here looking straight into the crotch upside down. There was virtually no sap wood
underneath here in several locations, and 1/2" thick right next to it. This is the challenge now.
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Here's what I'm talking about with water based (on the corbels) killing the warmth that the oil based (on the mantel) offers.
The mantel came from a 10' long local slab that was 27" wide at one end and 24" nominally.
I used the water based polyurethane on the corbels, because I thought it would help in the shadow of the mantle.
 

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