Dyna-Gro Bonzai Pro Fertilizer

rockm

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Yeah, but plain old Miracle Gro works just as well...
 

greerhw

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I've been using it for about 5 years, works great, but half of my collection are pines and they don't get fertilized much during the growing season, usually one small bottle will last me two growing seasons.

Keep it green,
Harry
 

mcpesq817

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I use one of their other products that is 7-9-5, and it seems to work well. I intersperse feedings with MiracleGro, and sometimes MirAcid.
 

djlen

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I'm always a little skeptical when a product has 'Bonzai' as part of it's name.
Usually over priced and unnecessary. I've been getting by with Miracle Grow/Acid
for 40 years and don't see any reason to change now.
Just wondered if anyone had any experience with it.
 

Redwing

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I've been getting by ....
for 40 years and don't see any reason to change now.

And that, my friends, is the most concise summary of the state of American bonsai that I have ever heard. Bravo.

-rw
 
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rockm

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Don't know if that's a jab at djlen, but in the case of fertilizers, his answer is not only practical, it's worth listening to.

N is N, P is P, K is K. Plants don't know the difference. They don't care if it's got "bonsai" in the name, a 400 percent markup or a nice plastic container. They don't care if they get it from poo balls (talk about antiquated technology), or from hydoponic solution, as long as they get it.

Ask Walter Pall what he uses on his extensive collection and he will tell you "what ever's on sale" at the local Wal Mart (or the German Equivalent).

I've used this product--along with the company's other "bonsai' product--"Dynagrow Pro-Tekt"-- which is supposed to make bonsai more drought tolerant by supplementing silica. I found that using them both at the same time, caused some problems, as the silicates precipitated out of solution. It makes a mess and can clog drainage...
 

Redwing

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Don't know if that's a jab at djlen, but in the case of fertilizers, his answer is not only practical, it's worth listening to.

Sorry -- not at all intended to be a jab at djlen, just a quip about the hopeless conservatism on the US scene that defines the quality of trees that we are currently producing as success, and then asks why we should change or learn from the Japanese or anyone else given that we're already successful.

And sure, no disagreement from me regarding fertilizers. I'll continue to use some part organic because it seems to help with mycorrhizal growth, but I confess to having little hard evidence even on that point.

-rw
 

rockm

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"Sorry -- not at all intended to be a jab at djlen, just a quip about the hopeless conservatism on the US scene that defines the quality of trees that we are currently producing as success, and then asks why we should change or learn from the Japanese or anyone else given that we're already successful."

I think I understand what you're saying. I don't necessarily agree with it. I think American bonsai has come quite a long way in the last 15-20 years and is progressing ever faster. I mean, was the flat top BC design "conservative?" Is the increasing emphasis on native species the same? I've never seen a period in my time in bonsai when there has been so much creative expertise around--I mean how many Kimura educated experts are there now? Look at the ever increasing list of excellent, world class bonsai potters living all over the US?

I do, however, see a bit of what I think you're talking about. There will always be a contingent that has set its idea of bonsai in stone and refuses to budge--just as there is in Japan and Europe.
 

Redwing

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I think I understand what you're saying. I don't necessarily agree with it. I think American bonsai has come quite a long way in the last 15-20 years and is progressing ever faster. I mean, was the flat top BC design "conservative?" Is the increasing emphasis on native species the same? I've never seen a period in my time in bonsai when there has been so much creative expertise around--I mean how many Kimura educated experts are there now? Look at the ever increasing list of excellent, world class bonsai potters living all over the US?

Fair enough. In the vanguard there is ample creative energy, and we have a number of Japanese-trained artists practicing and teaching in the US now -- to our enormous benefit. I should have further qualified my statement by describing it as a statement about "club-level American bonsai" or such. But I suppose you're right, the same thing may be equally true of club-level bonsai elsewhere as well.

-rw
 

greerhw

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Because of my organic free soil, I use a liquid fertilizer, Dyna-Gro fits my needs.

Keep it green,
Harry
 
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rockm

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I've found that clubs sometimes have a contingent that likes simply being in power and calling the shots. This group tends to sit in one place a very long time telling itself how great its work is--when, in fact, it REALLY sucks. There ideas and trees have been set in stone for decades and are doomed to remain there. I've seen some "knowledgeable" club members trees that haven't been seriously styled since the second Reagan administration.

Been there, done that, ran like heck away from it. Joined another (younger and less oppressive) club.
 

Redwing

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I've found that clubs sometimes have a contingent that likes simply being in power and calling the shots. This group tends to sit in one place a very long time telling itself how great its work is--when, in fact, it REALLY sucks. There ideas and trees have been set in stone for decades and are doomed to remain there. I've seen some "knowledgeable" club members trees that haven't been seriously styled since the second Reagan administration.

Precisely. That's exactly 100% what I'm talking about.

Add to that the fact that our local club prefers having these "knowledgeable" members do our meeting demos rather than having national or international artists come through and challenge their preconceptions, and you've got one depressing scene.

-rw
 

djlen

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Don't know if that's a jab at djlen, but in the case of fertilizers, his answer is not only practical, it's worth listening to.

N is N, P is P, K is K. Plants don't know the difference.

Ask Walter Pall what he uses on his extensive collection and he will tell you "what ever's on sale" at the local Wal Mart (or the German Equivalent).

And guys.....a plant is a plant. It has the same needs it had 40 - 60 years ago and I'm so old that when I find something that works over time I'm kinda stubborn about changing.
If I can find Peters at $2 cheaper with same ratios in it, it's in the basket..:)

I did not take the comment as a jab or negative at all, btw.
 

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