Early Pine Bud Treatment Question

FrankP999

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
45
Location
Macon, Georgia U.S.A.
USDA Zone
8
I have a young JBP that is in the growing stage. It is planted in a large Vance Wood screen-sided planter. At the end of the top terminal there are multiple buds. I want to re-direct energy lower on the tree. I will perform the usual de-candle routine in early July.

Can I remove some of these buds now? It seems to me that if I remove some of the buds now, energy would not be wasted developing candles on this terminal top and would go to other areas. Photo is attached Thanks

Frank
 

Attachments

  • _DSC1038a.jpg
    _DSC1038a.jpg
    110.7 KB · Views: 93

Klytus

Omono
Messages
1,305
Reaction score
22
Location
Singing Pines Tyneside-England
USDA Zone
8a
They look like flowers to me.

Here is a picture of a later stage.

 

garywood

Chumono
Messages
944
Reaction score
689
Location
N. Alabama
USDA Zone
7
Hi Frank, what you are seeing is (male) pollen cones. It won't matter if you remove them now because the energy is already spent, which is very little anyway. The question I have is why would you be doing candle work at this stage? Once you start candle work caliper growth slows waaaayy down. I don't know your ultimate goal and I'm being quite presumptuous, which I shouldn't but I would hate to see you lose years in development if you want a little girth
Wood
 

FrankP999

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
45
Location
Macon, Georgia U.S.A.
USDA Zone
8
Wood
Thanks. I DO want girth at this point. I was thinking that if I "pre-candle" it would re-direct the energy lower on the trunk.

Thanks

Frank
 

Klytus

Omono
Messages
1,305
Reaction score
22
Location
Singing Pines Tyneside-England
USDA Zone
8a
I think it would produce new buds lower on the trunk but only by a 1/16 of an inch or so.

It's like the plant commits to growth at that point and it's decision is final.
 

garywood

Chumono
Messages
944
Reaction score
689
Location
N. Alabama
USDA Zone
7
Frank, have you ever noticed when pruning hedges or landscape plants that the new growth appears where the cut is made. It's the same with bonsai physiologically. In the development stage the main goal is to focus on building one thing at a time. It starts with the roots,trunk, branches and later secondary branches and ramification. If initial rootwork is done then concentrate on caliper at the point below where there will be direction change from a new leader. When that is established use the original top as sacrifice. you will have to thin the sacrifice, anything that shades the eventual tree and remove needles to just under the sacrifice's bud whorl and let it grow wild. Those shoots at the end are the driving force of the tree. It's where the majority of auxin's are manufactured, they grow roots. It's the combination leaving those buds and stripping the needles and weak branches on the sacrifice that kicks in the survival mechanism (back bud) and you don't stop or slow down caliper growth Hope I'm clear. This is just one way to develop black pine, there are as many as there are people and everyone has a reason for doing what they do. There is even an old Japanese book 80 WAYS TO GROW BLACK PINE. Have fun with your pines. When you grow one for yourself you will really appreciate a good one when you see it.
Wood
 

bonhe

Masterpiece
Messages
3,663
Reaction score
6,874
Location
Riverside, CA
USDA Zone
11
Hi Wood,
looks like I have been using the same method as yours. I have been training for 60 Korean black pine since they were 8 months old. However, I still care for the future trunk and branches in the mean time (I decandled or break candles of the future trunk and branches when time is appropriated)

Hi Frank, with this picture, I hope it makes clear to you. Bonhe


 

garywood

Chumono
Messages
944
Reaction score
689
Location
N. Alabama
USDA Zone
7
Bonhe, I couldn't have said it better :) A 1000 words
Wood
 

FrankP999

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
45
Location
Macon, Georgia U.S.A.
USDA Zone
8
wood and bonhe, thanks. That helps. I am familiar with pruning/pinchins maples and the fact that new growth appears at the cut. I guess my mind is messed up with what I have read about pines and pinching back/holding back strong areas to make the weaker areas stronger.
 

garywood

Chumono
Messages
944
Reaction score
689
Location
N. Alabama
USDA Zone
7
Frank, what you are saying is correct but only in the context of a finished tree. As trees go through differing stages of development there are differing techniques for each stage, one size does not fit all. This is an ongoing problem for most beginners with any new species. What most articles,books or publications address is the finishing, the easy part,the glitter. I just hate to see years of work wasted.
Wood
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom