Elm budding

Steve C

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Are Elms late to wake up as compared to other species? Reason I ask is last summer I bought my first Elm at the Bonsai show. Nice little tree that I think has some potential. It spent the winter in the shed storage and just took it out about 2 weeks ago. No signs of buds yet at all. It's still very much alive, very green under bark and branches are very limber, jut no signs of buds or anything yet so wondered if they are just late to come to life after coming out of winter storage maybe?
 

Bonsai Nut

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Are Elms late to wake up as compared to other species?
Depends on the species - and even the cultivar - of the elm.

My cork-bark Chinese elms are the first things to bud out in my garden. Other Chinese elm cultivars are much later - as much as two months later for me. And other species of elms can be just as late. Cedar elms, Eastern Winged Elms, English elms - all are relatively late compared to my cork bark Chinese elms.
 
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Steve C

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I've been trying for a couple days now to remember exactly what species they said it was when I got it but my memory these days just plain sucks. I know it had really nice small leaves with somewhat pointy ends all around the edges of the leaves. Thinking maybe Chinese elm but for some reason I am just thinking it was something other than that.
 

Steve C

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Okay will do. Right now it's pretty shaded since its got wood lattice structure around it. I'll move it out on to one of the monkey poles in full sun today. Well....IF we ever get a sunny day again here that is :confused:
 

Shibui

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Lots of buds, small internodes and long straight growth - looks like 'Seiju' to me which is a variety of Chinese elm. They are normally among the first to bud over here, sometimes starting in mid winter in our (relatively) mild climate.
The bark looks a little wrinkled down low on the trunk - not a good sign. Keep watering as normal for another few months but I don't think this one is going to make it. Scratch test on the trunk may show whether the cambium is alive or dead.
 

Steve C

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The bark looks a little wrinkled down low on the trunk - not a good sign. Keep watering as normal for another few months but I don't think this one is going to make it. Scratch test on the trunk may show whether the cambium is alive or dead.
No it's very much alive that's for sure. I scratched the trunk in a few spots the other day and it's very nice and green under the bark. Limbs are nice and limber as well so nothing is dead on it at all, just no buds. I'm just wondering if it takes awhile was my main concern. I did just take it out of dark winter storage about 14 days ago so not sure if that's enough time to get buds or not? But it hasn't really had much sun. I just moved it a few hours ago to where it will get full sun like BN said to do.
 

Tieball

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I’d snip off a few branches...just the tips with about 5-6 buds. Take those inside and take them apart under a magnifying glass. See if there are green buds awaiting an opening ceremony. Check the stems for life. If green. Be patient.
I agree with @Shibui ...looks like the Seiju to me also.
 

sorce

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I just talked to a lady came down from Milwaukee, said it gets greener on the way down...

I have half an elm that was a little slow....

If you're north as Milwaukee....
You're probly good!

Sorce
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Watched an MSU Extension Service on the weather today for Tree Fruit and Small Fruit growers for Michigan. We are at the 30th percentile for coolest spring. About 150 base 50 degree days behind normal. Night time lows have been near normal, but daytime highs have been cool to cold, due to heavy cloud cover or clouds and rain. We are way ahead on rain. North Atlantic Oscillation index is negative, meaning the pattern is likely to hold until about middle of June. Cooler than normal. They are predicting it to dry out some now, but stay cool through at least June 7 maybe through June 15 for Lower Peninsula of Michigan.

South of Muskegon they say it is likely we will not have a late spring frost, or if we do, it will only be a degree or two of frost.

@M. Frary - they said Milo Michigan is screwed, you will get hard freeze and 3 feet of snow before June 7.

Just thought I'd warn ya buddy (frost part is real, I'm joking about the snow)
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Whole point is all the apples, pears, cherries and such are behind about a week or two from normal. My blueberries are behind. So your elm being late is not surprising. We have not had daytime heat.

Spruces, larch and other cold weather growers are probably right on schedule, or even ahead of schedule, as they don't need daytime heat to grow, they grow well in 40 to 50 F weather.
 

Steve C

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@M. Frary - they said Milo Michigan is screwed, you will get hard freeze and 3 feet of snow before June 7.

LOL:eek::D:D:D
 

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