EUROPEAN BEECH (red cultivar)

MACH5

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Last year I traded Judy for this beautiful and elegant red cultivar of European beech (fagus sylvatica). I have long loved this tree for its beautiful smooth light bark, scarless and thin elegant trunk and gorgeous foliage. Yes there is still a place for thin trunked trees in the bonsai world. The tree looks strong and healthy with well placed and developed branches. Judy acquired this tree a few years ago and did a beautiful job moving it forward and keeping it strong and healthy. It clearly thrived under her care.

When I received it from her it had a beautiful yellow golden autumn color. After I enjoyed it for a while, I defoliated it to get a better look at the general structure. In looking at the overall canopy mass against the trunk girth, I decided to reduce and simplify it to enhance its elegance. In the photos I tilted the tree slightly with a small piece of cardboard underneath to enhance the movement towards the left.

Here is Judy's original thread which is titled "Japanese Red Beech": https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/japanese-red-beech.15074/. In that thread, it was determined it was a red cultivar of European beech and not a Japanese beech. The bark almost seems to glow and is much whiter than many other sylvaticas I have seen which have a much grayer bark coloration.

Below the tree recently pruned, wired and set for its next phase of development.
















A root that was growing awkwardly upwards and towards the front was cut back shorter to roots growing closer to the trunk.

 

D1raq

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Excellent! I to enjoy the light color bark and elegance that this tree presents to the viewer. +A
 

leatherback

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Thank you for making me reconsider my "chopped" red beech stump in a growbox.
Should go out and get me a sapling to grow out as elegant dancer.
 
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Yes there is still a place for thin trunked trees in the bonsai world
amen ??

can i please ask how high the lowest branch is from the soil?

I am asking because, if i may, i think a lot of people (myself included) who might come across a much younger version of this trunk at a nursery would doubt their ability to make great artistic use of that lowest section of the trunk (especially if it was all that was in the pot at the time!). Looking back to @JudyB ’s thread, it seems like it took great vision to see the changes and developments she made! To my young eye, the middle and upper trunk is an extraordinary example of a masterfully executed design that really allows the material’s inherent qualities to shine forth, as expected from @JudyB and you of course!

love this tree!!
 
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I have long loved this tree for its beautiful smooth light bark, scarless and thin elegant trunk and gorgeous foliage. Yes there is still a place for thin trunked trees in the bonsai world.
I don’t think anyone would dare call this a “stick in a pot,” LOL!

Very nice!
 

MACH5

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amen ??

can i please ask how high the lowest branch is from the soil?

I am asking because, if i may, i think a lot of people (myself included) who might come across a much younger version of this trunk at a nursery would doubt their ability to make great artistic use of that lowest section of the trunk (especially if it was all that was in the pot at the time!). Looking back to @JudyB ’s thread, it seems like it took great vision to see the changes and developments she made! To my young eye, the middle and upper trunk is an extraordinary example of a masterfully executed design that really allows the material’s inherent qualities to shine forth, as expected from @JudyB and you of course!

love this tree!!

Hi Derek. Can't remember exactly but the first branch I'd say is about 13" from the base. Normally I am not a fan of "long necked trees". I prefer branches set much lower on the trunk specially on deciduous bonsai. But with this tree, the subtle curve of the scarless trunk line and very gentle taper really did appeal to me. It has a quiet simplicity and elegance.

I would like to also say that Judy had done a great job with this tree and set it up for future success.
 

Nybonsai12

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Very nice work Sergio. very graceful.
 

MACH5

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I don’t think anyone would dare call this a “stick in a pot,” LOL!

Very nice!

LOL Sal! I hope not but if so I think it is a very good stick in a pot! :p This tree is actually much larger than I had originally thought at 32" tall. This is one tree that has been grown slowly in a pot for many years and will continue to improve. It has that "slowly cooked" quality as I like to say.
 

MACH5

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I like the way you designed the braches and twigs, Sergio.
They have got this 3d-appeal.
Not flattened out, wich would be (imho) unnatural and unsuitable for this species...

Thanks Arnie! Also aiming for a divided rounded apex instead of opting for a single one. To your point, I think it is precisely the multi level branch structure within a single pad that gives deciduous trees their own unique character.
 

Gary McCarthy

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REALLY like the blemish free trunk. You usually don't see them that nice on deciduous trees.

I think the color on the pot goes well with the tree. NICE!!!
 

BobbyLane

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wonderful styling Mach. those smaller branches off to the rear give a real sense of depth and perspective.that theyre much smaller in width to the lowest branches really enhances that feel. as does the photography...
i see what you did there!
the staggered, not uniform approach to the outline, very natural looking.
 

LanceMac10

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wonderful styling Mach. those smaller branches off to the rear give a real sense of depth and perspective.that theyre much smaller in width to the lowest branches really enhances that feel. as does the photography...
i see what you did there!
the staggered, not uniform approach to the outline, very natural looking.





.... @BobbyLane thinking could use some deadwood features.....trigger finger gettin' itchy!;):D:D:D:D:D:D:D



stompin' tech' wiring!!:cool:
 

leatherback

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Any tips on how to develop te ramification? I had to cut a beech back to stubs this winter as all the branches were just getting really lanky :(
 

JudyB

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I like it! The only niggle that I have (and it's probably from a 2d photo) is the U shaped almost antler like top two apex branches. But she's looking good.
 
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