Experience with Pruning Burning Bush

Apex37

Shohin
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Just curious other's experiences with this species. I have one I got from HD some time back that I'm planning on repotting and doing some pruning once spring starts up (usually here it's best the last week of Feb or first 2 weeks of March).

Interested to hear about how well they back bud and take root prunings. I imagine the roots are mess, but it does have a slight nebari forming I'm hoping to capitalize on. Not sure on how well they back bud off hardwood, but from what I can tell they're pretty hardy. I really love the bark this thing forms naturally and of course the showy bright red fall color.

Planning on repotting this into an Anderson flat along with a couple other trees beginning of spring.
 

Gaitano

Mame
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In my experience with a collected euonymous from the wild (Midwest US) and an air layer from a landscape tree, the roots are fine and full the pot every year. Yearly root pruning in the spring and they don’t skip a beat.

As for pruning of the branches, I usually do that in the fall right after leaf drop for trees still in the young stage. They back bud pretty well on the branches and trunk and nebari for that fact too not just at your typical branch areas. My trees only flush once a year so if I prune in the spring after bud break and hardening, I don’t get a second flush of growth, but all the energy fattens the dormant buds for the next spring. some folks have said they get a second flush, maybe they have a different cultivar?

If the tree is in refinement I will prune back to shape after leaf harden in late spring. If I need more branch girth or strength in the tree or trunk I just let ‘em run all year. This can also lead to wings growing on some branches. I have an air layer I’m working on from a landscape bush (haven’t separated yet) and the branches have wings


They are a very hardy species and fun to work with. The fall color can be very rewarding. I have photos of the two I’ve been working on, check out my previous posts.
 

Apex37

Shohin
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In my experience with a collected euonymous from the wild (Midwest US) and an air layer from a landscape tree, the roots are fine and full the pot every year. Yearly root pruning in the spring and they don’t skip a beat.

As for pruning of the branches, I usually do that in the fall right after leaf drop for trees still in the young stage. They back bud pretty well on the branches and trunk and nebari for that fact too not just at your typical branch areas. My trees only flush once a year so if I prune in the spring after bud break and hardening, I don’t get a second flush of growth, but all the energy fattens the dormant buds for the next spring. some folks have said they get a second flush, maybe they have a different cultivar?

If the tree is in refinement I will prune back to shape after leaf harden in late spring. If I need more branch girth or strength in the tree or trunk I just let ‘em run all year. This can also lead to wings growing on some branches. I have an air layer I’m working on from a landscape bush (haven’t separated yet) and the branches have wings


They are a very hardy species and fun to work with. The fall color can be very rewarding. I have photos of the two I’ve been working on, check out my previous posts.
This all great information, thank you so much for sharing!

Great to hear they're as hardy as I had hoped. I was planning on doing a major root pruning come early spring and probably let it grow wild for the first year and then maybe think about pruning. I hadn't touched it all year and just let it do its thing. Trying to get the trunk to thicken some before thinking about styling, but from how well they back bud that doesn't look to be any problem down the road.
 

Gaitano

Mame
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Nope, shouldn't be a problem, and I have found that yearly root pruning is necessary. Once in a pot, they develop a nice thick root mat. Check out this thread, posts 16 and 14, as an example of 7 years of back budding and branch development.

 
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