Fagus sylvatica Purperea Pendula

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Anyone here growing dwarf weeping purple beech? Or know of someone with developed trees?

I haven’t been able to find any examples of “finished” trees. I have two and Am looking for styling ideas. They’re about 2’ tall with 2-3” trunks.
 

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0soyoung

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I've got no answers for you, just more questions.

The nebari sucks, in my estimation. There are radical/risky approaches to this such as a layer low on the trunk, hoping to get roots all around. Then there are more conservative ones like nipping away at that really big and ugly one as well as a few others via several years of annual repotting. Do you like the nebari as it is? Maybe you think it is not so bad or you've got ideas of making it a feature = like a pug, so ugly it is cute (not that there is anything wrong with that, I love pugs).

There's an ugly scar about 1/3rd of the way up from the ground. Are you thinking this will be an uro and a feature of the bonsai composition? If so, you'll want the foliage to be low and positioned to 'frame' it, or to focus that viewer's attention on it. To make this happen you'll need some longer descending branches AND you'll want the nebari to be A+ since it won't be that far below the uro.

Alternatively, just pick a front so this uro-thingy isn't seen, which would seem to be something like your first photo. OMG, that nebari is literally butt-ugly and not something I would like to exhibit. The trunk also has nearly no movement and no taper at all in this view. Do you know if you can make buds pop lower on the trunk or whether you can grow branches long enough to make thread grafts down lower? Buds would be best, but thread grafting is also good. That thing just needs some lower branches!!! At roughly 50% (plus a little or minus some) the present trunk height you'd have the beginnings for a great broom or naturalistic tree of reasonable bonsai proportions, IMHO.
 

Cruiser

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I've got no answers for you, just more questions.

The nebari sucks, in my estimation. There are radical/risky approaches to this such as a layer low on the trunk, hoping to get roots all around. Then there are more conservative ones like nipping away at that really big and ugly one as well as a few others via several years of annual repotting. Do you like the nebari as it is? Maybe you think it is not so bad or you've got ideas of making it a feature = like a pug, so ugly it is cute (not that there is anything wrong with that, I love pugs).

There's an ugly scar about 1/3rd of the way up from the ground. Are you thinking this will be an uro and a feature of the bonsai composition? If so, you'll want the foliage to be low and positioned to 'frame' it, or to focus that viewer's attention on it. To make this happen you'll need some longer descending branches AND you'll want the nebari to be A+ since it won't be that far below the uro.

Alternatively, just pick a front so this uro-thingy isn't seen, which would seem to be something like your first photo. OMG, that nebari is literally butt-ugly and not something I would like to exhibit. The trunk also has nearly no movement and no taper at all in this view. Do you know if you can make buds pop lower on the trunk or whether you can grow branches long enough to make thread grafts down lower? Buds would be best, but thread grafting is also good. That thing just needs some lower branches!!! At roughly 50% (plus a little or minus some) the present trunk height you'd have the beginnings for a great broom or naturalistic tree of reasonable bonsai proportions, IMHO.
Thanks. Lots of ideas here.
There’s actually two trees in these photos. One has a root jutting to the left. I’m just letting that one do it’s thing and will evaluate come winter.

The other tree pictured with the pen is one that I’ve been working on. I’m planning to keep the nebari and picked an interesting trunk line through the mess of leaves and branches (you just can’t see it yet). The trunk is not as straight as the pictures let on and has some unusual movement within the canopy.
The scar is sort of heart-shaped. I considered a uro but wonder if it would be possible to enhance the heart shape, carve in some tiny initials and make it into some sort of romantic arborglyph?
I hedge pruned the tree back in early June to try and get some back budding further down the trunk. There hasn’t been much so I may give it another trim end of July.

These are unusual trees with a fair bit of reverse taper and odd branching habits. Ive been told they aren’t “workable”, but perfection isn’t my goal. Ultimately I’d like to embrace the idiosyncrasies and create something weird but beautiful.
 

BobbyLane

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'I haven’t been able to find any examples of “finished” trees. I have two and Am looking for styling ideas'

if you google fagus pendula, there are loads of wild tree examples🤔
 

RoadManDenDron

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sorry no answers and just another question please don't take this as advice I just wonder if it would work as I have a similar situation on a different tree (with a much smaller gap)

The nebari on the second one (with the pen) the base looks quite flared and I was wondering if that gap between roots could be encouraged to fill possibly by scarring or something?
 

Cruiser

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sorry no answers and just another question please don't take this as advice I just wonder if it would work as I have a similar situation on a different tree (with a much smaller gap)

The nebari on the second one (with the pen) the base looks quite flared and I was wondering if that gap between roots could be encouraged to fill possibly by scarring or something?
I’m not sure. It would probably improve the look of the nebari.
 

Cruiser

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'I haven’t been able to find any examples of “finished” trees. I have two and Am looking for styling ideas'

if you google fagus pendula, there are loads of wild tree examples🤔
I was hoping to see a bonsai example of this type of beech in particular (just to know it can be done). It has peculiar growth habits with no natural leaders and only gets a few feet tall.
 

Potawatomi13

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Consider change of planting angle to bring unseen roots to surface and submerge more visible ones. Also could thread graft seedlings for new roots or both of above.
Personal European Beech has same root problem. Next season(Spring 2022)plan is to do one or both of these.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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sorry no answers and just another question please don't take this as advice I just wonder if it would work as I have a similar situation on a different tree (with a much smaller gap)

The nebari on the second one (with the pen) the base looks quite flared and I was wondering if that gap between roots could be encouraged to fill possibly by scarring or something?
There are ways, like scarring and adding rooting hormone, then covering it with moss and hoping roots will grow. Root grafts are possible as wel: take a few cuttings, cut out a wedge of the base, push the seedling in, let grow until they merge and then remove the trunk of the seedling, leaving only the roots.

My 2 cents for this thread:
Weeping trees work well if they're tall. Look at Mirai and some of their weeping trees, some of them are at least hitting shoulder height. I think that's a key factor in weeping trees, especially because you can get the foliage smaller with relative ease, but I'm not sure if the branch thickness would scale down as good/well as the foliage would. Weeping birches and willows could offer some good reference points for designs.
 

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