Fastest Growing, Most Hardy

yenling83

Chumono
Messages
915
Reaction score
966
Location
Nipomo, CA
I'm curious from your experience what would you say the top 3 fastest growing and most hardy types of Junipers are?

Thanks!
 

darrellw

Mame
Messages
244
Reaction score
1
Location
Vancouver, WA, USA
USDA Zone
8
San Jose (Juniperus chinensis 'San Jose')
Procumbens (Juniperus procumbens)
Shimpaku (Juniperus chinensis 'Shimpaku')
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
9,269
Reaction score
17,079
Location
Charlotte area, North Carolina
USDA Zone
7B
I'm not going to disagree with Darrell's list, but I think it is hard for me to rank junipers because they are ALL relatively hardy and fast-growing in my opinion.
 

Smoke

Ignore-Amus
Messages
11,570
Reaction score
19,776
Location
Fresno, CA
USDA Zone
9
Foemina
San Jose
Prostrata

Fast compared to what?

Foemina will grow to three inches+ across in 5 to 6 years. San Jose and prostrata will take about 15 years to get to 3 inches across. About an inch/5 years. Oh...you want movement...add 30% more time to those numbers.

Trident maple will get to three inches in about four years in the ground.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
Messages
11,798
Reaction score
32,175
Location
B’ham, AL
USDA Zone
8A
What about Hollywood juniper, Juniperus chinensis 'Torulosa'? I see them around here and even into Florida. They seem to grow pretty fast, and being in the chinensis family, the foliage is a good color and texture. I haven't grown one, but they seem like they could be good candidates.
 

yenling83

Chumono
Messages
915
Reaction score
966
Location
Nipomo, CA
Thanks for the replys!

Smoke- I mean fastest comparing only differnt types of junipers with other types of junipers.
So say 5 years per 1 inch w/ San Jose and prostrata. What about Shimpaku-how man inches per year? What about Kishu Shimpaku and Itowagawa?

What do you think about growing trunks w/ movement and curve, then grafting shimpaku or other foliage onto Fomina? I feel like I've never seen this and there's probably a reason why.


I believe this questions is also depends where you live. i.e. sierra juniper might do really well in one location, but not in another.
 

darrellw

Mame
Messages
244
Reaction score
1
Location
Vancouver, WA, USA
USDA Zone
8
In my experience, San Jose will bulk up the trunk faster that Shimpaku or Procumbens. But unless you then graft new foliage, you have to deal with San Jose's tendency to have juvenile (needle) and scale foliage at the same time.
 

Dwight

Chumono
Messages
599
Reaction score
7
Location
El Paso , TX
I've had procumbens grow like crazy but never really bulk up.

How about horizantalis such as blue rug ( New England native )
 

misfit11

Chumono
Messages
804
Reaction score
941
Location
Petaluma CA
USDA Zone
15
I'm not going to disagree with Darrell's list, but I think it is hard for me to rank junipers because they are ALL relatively hardy and fast-growing in my opinion.

RMJ are very slow growing.
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
Messages
11,009
Reaction score
20,684
Location
North Georgia/lived in MA until 2009
USDA Zone
7b
RMJ are very slow growing.

Actually, based on my personal experience, I would say that RMJ have a comparable growth rate to other junipers when grown in pots and fertilized. I've got several yamadori that might have taken upwards of 500 years to achieve trunk girths approaching 6-8 inches, but they were growing in very hostile conditions during that time. I actually need to watch my RMJ more closely then my shimpakus for wire damage...their smaller branches fatten up pretty fast, and I've had them put on 8 - 12" plus of new growth in a summer (when I lived in MA).

Dave
 

jk_lewis

Masterpiece
Messages
3,820
Reaction score
1,109
Location
Western NC
USDA Zone
7-8
That seems to me to be an unanswerable (with any validity) question, and therefore, rather pointless.

It does depend on where (climate, sunlight, wind, snow, ice, rainfall (including acid rain) ) you are growing them.

Also depends on:

Their overall health.
Their age.
Where they're growing - field, grow box, training pot, bonsai pot.
How and how often they are fertilized.
Various cultural practices -- pruning, pinching, wiring, etc.
Substrate.
Health at any given time.
Their size.

and probably many, many other conditions.
 

yenling83

Chumono
Messages
915
Reaction score
966
Location
Nipomo, CA
That seems to me to be an unanswerable (with any validity) question, and therefore, rather pointless.

It does depend on where (climate, sunlight, wind, snow, ice, rainfall (including acid rain) ) you are growing them.

Also depends on:

Their overall health.
Their age.
Where they're growing - field, grow box, training pot, bonsai pot.
How and how often they are fertilized.
Various cultural practices -- pruning, pinching, wiring, etc.
Substrate.
Health at any given time.
Their size.

and probably many, many other conditions.

Yes, you are correct- However I'm just wondering about this in theory. So Let's assume we could some how magically put them into their ideal growing conditions- which I understand would not all be in the same location, possibly the same soil, etc. Also you give each juniper the same amount of water, fert and over all treated it the same, they were the same age, etc. If you could give each juniper it's perfect environment, then in what order would the differn't types of junipers grow?

Also, I'm wondering about this mostly in terms of trunk thickness. I like AL's answers that was the kind of thing i'm really interested in.
 

capnk

Mame
Messages
125
Reaction score
6
Yenling,
We grow shimpaku - kishu and itoigawa varieties. I consider them "semi-dwarf" compared to some of the large garden variety junipers.
Several people have told me that one cannot grow shimpaku in Oregon because it's too wet.
I will have to disagree with them.
I can offer you observations on the two varieties.
The kishu grow much longer leaders and will make bigger bushes.
In spite of the fact that the itoigawa look like smaller bushes, they trunk up better than the kishu.
If you are trying to grow trees for trunk size, you would be wise to put them in the ground. We put them in root control bags. We have just lifted a workshop group of itoigawas with trunk diameters of 2 inches or more. They were in the ground 5 years.
Good luck,
Chris
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom