Ficus religiosa

Messages
98
Likes
76
Location
Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5
#1
I guess this is a somewhat random question, but can I repot them now while they are semi-dormant, or is it always better to wait until the middle of summer and they are actively growing?

I have two little ones (basically just rooted cuttings) I bought last summer. I didn't repot them when I got them because I wanted them to recover from shipping. Plus the soil they were in didn't seem too bad at the time.
But, by now, the soil is rock hard, and both plants have tons of roots coming out of the pots. They really need to be repotted as soon as possible... plus I want to get them into bigger pots to grow out. They are indoors in a nearly 100% humidity growing case until it's warm enough to put them out, so they are growing, but very slowly. Not active vigorous growth. Is it important that I wait until they are growing more actively outdoors in a few months?
aprlate 001.JPG
 
Messages
98
Likes
76
Location
Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5
#2
Oh and I know the leaves look spotty, but there's no sign of any pests. From what I've heard, it's just normal for them to look a little sad over winter.
 
Messages
45
Likes
20
Location
Islamabad, Pakistan
USDA Zone
9b
#3
I guess this is a somewhat random question, but can I repot them now while they are semi-dormant, or is it always better to wait until the middle of summer and they are actively growing?

I have two little ones (basically just rooted cuttings) I bought last summer. I didn't repot them when I got them because I wanted them to recover from shipping. Plus the soil they were in didn't seem too bad at the time.
But, by now, the soil is rock hard, and both plants have tons of roots coming out of the pots. They really need to be repotted as soon as possible... plus I want to get them into bigger pots to grow out. They are indoors in a nearly 100% humidity growing case until it's warm enough to put them out, so they are growing, but very slowly. Not active vigorous growth. Is it important that I wait until they are growing more actively outdoors in a few months?
View attachment 188470
nice bird and nice click.
 
Messages
115
Likes
55
Location
NE Florida
USDA Zone
9a
#4
My advice to you with this species would be once spring hits, to re-pot into a 5-10 gallon nursery pot with rich yet well-draining soil containing compost. Let it grow and forget the “bonsai” aspect of soil composition for now. This species loves rich soil. You will be amazed at how much it will grow in one season if given space and good soil, especially since you’ve surpassed the establishment phase from seedling. After a season or two, you can easily cast several air-layers intermittently throughout the plant as long as there is foliage between each. This will give you several more mature specimen to work with while simultaneously serving as a hard prune/ trunk chop.
 
Messages
45
Likes
20
Location
Islamabad, Pakistan
USDA Zone
9b
#5
My advice to you with this species would be once spring hits, to re-pot into a 5-10 gallon nursery pot with rich yet well-draining soil containing compost. Let it grow and forget the “bonsai” aspect of soil composition for now. This species loves rich soil. You will be amazed at how much it will grow in one season if given space and good soil, especially since you’ve surpassed the establishment phase from seedling. After a season or two, you can easily cast several air-layers intermittently throughout the plant as long as there is foliage between each. This will give you several more mature specimen to work with while simultaneously serving as a hard prune/ trunk chop.
agreed and good piece of advice
 

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