Field Growing for Future Bonsai Project

ichoudhury

Sapling
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49
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Location
Georgia, USA
USDA Zone
7B
So today I prepared my field growing beds about 8-9" deep (approximately 2(8ftx2ft ) bed

-Added some organic compost I had for my vegetable garden (40 lbs per bed)
- 1 bag turface per bed
- 1.5 bag Coral Sand (I had sitting around) per bed
- 10-10-10 Fert (I already had)
- Rock Dust (also I had which intended for my Vegetable Garden)
- Humic Acid/Fulvic Acid (I had for my vegetable garden)

I mixed them up quite good and then took all my japanese maple graft (about 7-8 of them) that I had in different size pot, and planted them in one bed and used another bed for planting 10 Trident seedling I recently purchased. I guess I will update you in 5 years or so, how it all went. :p

- I have to watch out for the Graft when it come to Trunk chopping :-D
- I have to be little nice to those Japanese Maple as they might not be as "Trunk Chop" tolerant as those Trident maples.

Anyway, I know I should have tested the soil for pH and all, but I just had to finish up in rush and nwo they are planted. I will check out the soil status later, but feel that it wont be that bad.

I was curious how many of you have done something like this? Would you have done anything different than what I mentioned above?
 

Fangorn

Shohin
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CT
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6
It sounds like they should do well, but from what I have seen they would do even better and the growing area would require less prep work by using ROOT CONTROL BAGS
I've seen the results first hand from a Scots pine I bought from Telperion Farms and a club member that is using them to grow bonsai stock. The growth rate is better, and because of the denser root system you get a quicker and less stressful transition from ground to pot
 

ichoudhury

Sapling
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49
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Location
Georgia, USA
USDA Zone
7B
It sounds like they should do well, but from what I have seen they would do even better and the growing area would require less prep work by using ROOT CONTROL BAGS
I've seen the results first hand from a Scots pine I bought from Telperion Farms and a club member that is using them to grow bonsai stock. The growth rate is better, and because of the denser root system you get a quicker and less stressful transition from ground to pot
This is very interesting! Thanks for sharing!
 

digger714

Shohin
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367
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Location
Mooresville, NC - USA
USDA Zone
7B
I did the same with the beds, different mix but used pond baskets for my trees. Some of them grew at an incredible rate last year, the first year, so am looking for good results this year. They take a season to get used to the new home, and roots get established, then the second and third years produce some strong growth. The pond baskets should help keep an intact rootsystem when time to take out of the ground. I also have some i planted on tiles, but am taking up to arrange the roots better this spring. They are tridents, but only had a ball of roots when planted. Good luck with your new growing area.
 

_-ll-_

Seedling
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Kentucky
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6/7
What is a pond basket? I am very much new at this and need an education. Please advise.
Thanks.
 

Jason

Shohin
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Western Oregon
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8
Wow!...that sounds like lots of work. I just dig a hole and plant them on a tile with their roots arranged in a radial pattern. Now for the hard part.....you have to wait (and not mess with them) for at least 3 years ;) Keep reminding yourself that the more top growth the bigger the trunk diameter. Just watch out for inverse taper in any trunk sections you'll be keeping. When you dig them to root prune think about putting a tile under them to encourage a shallow root system and great nebari. I don't really see the advantage of using a bag or colander but everyone has their own system. They're like money in the bank...(like money in the bank when you used to get real interest on it...:cool:)
 

Jason

Shohin
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Western Oregon
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For an education visit Evergreen Gardenworks and read Brent Walston's articles section on trunk development (and everything else if you really want to learn). I'm forever indebted to this guy. Don't reinvent the wheel.
 
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