First glazed pots

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I want to share some pics of my first glazed pots. I'm aware that they are a bit wonky here and there but so am I. I hope they are "enjoyable", if not I hope some can at least appreciate the effort hahaha.
 

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Ichigo

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Did you glaze the insides too or just the lip? If so, I thought it was bad for the roots to glaze the inside all the way down. I like the shade of green on the first one.
 

irene_b

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I love them both and think you did a fantastic job!
I love the shapes and the colors.
You should see what mine looked like for my first try.....Nasty,Ugly...
Mom
 
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Did you glaze the insides too or just the lip? If so, I thought it was bad for the roots to glaze the inside all the way down. I like the shade of green on the first one.
I glazed the insides, didn't have time to remove the glaze there. Glaze on the inside is only bad for the professional potters bank account and possibly some "anal-compulsive Japanophiles"(as Nick Lenz calls them) and their fragile sense of reality...or something like that.
 
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I love them both and think you did a fantastic job!
I love the shapes and the colors.
You should see what mine looked like for my first try.....Nasty,Ugly...
Mom
Thanks Irene! I think I'll use them as accent pots or for candy hahaha. They're really small. I might put a native blueberry or something in the green one...we'll see...
 

Bill S

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Not bad for a first go a it No it's Not.

My take on glaze on the inside is that an unglazed pot lets the roots hold better, where the glaze is just too smooth. Funny thing is I had heard more than once that it was the pot breathed better unglazed, but jeez how much "breathability" would be added to the open top of the pot, plus the drainage holes. Bet Dale has a good answer for that ?
 
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Not bad for a first go a it No it's Not.

My take on glaze on the inside is that an unglazed pot lets the roots hold better, where the glaze is just too smooth. Funny thing is I had heard more than once that it was the pot breathed better unglazed, but jeez how much "breathability" would be added to the open top of the pot, plus the drainage holes. Bet Dale has a good answer for that ?
Thanks Bill! Yeah, I guess an unglazed pot would let the roots hold better, but I wire my trees to the pot until they've settled so in my case that's a non issue. I'm not sure I even understand the whole breathing-thing. I mean, is that a good thing? I understand that the roots needs oxygen, but if that's a problem I would have my soil do that job and not the pot. If someone would want the pot to breathe I would suggest a pond basket :)
 

Martin Sweeney

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No, it's not...

I like them both and think either would be a pleasure to own and use. You should be proud of your efforts, especially for first attempts. Both could be excellent pots for the right accent plant or small bonsai.

I hope you continue to make more pots.

Regards,

Martin
 

darrellw

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As far as "breathing", if these are stoneware, they are pretty much vitrified, and won't breath very much. And if the outside is glazed anyway, there wouldn't be anyplace to breath on the other side either.

If they are earthenware (like terra cotta), then the clay is porous enough that there is some breathing, but I doubt it makes a whole lot of difference with the porous soil mixes we use.

Nice start, by the way!

-Darrell
 

grouper52

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. . . and possibly some "anal-compulsive Japanophiles"(as Nick Lenz calls them) and their fragile sense of reality...or something like that.
I love it! LOL. But not as much as I love your pots! The blue one especially is quite nice.

This glazed-pots-not-breathing thing is mentioned in at least one Chinese book I have as well, but I've always suspected it was another bonsai myth that had little chance of holding up to scrutiny - the ideas mentioned here to question its validity seem sound, but I wonder if anyone has ever tested it experimentally? Anecdotally, I got a few small trees in lovely totally glazed and even porcelain pots, and they are doing about as well as I could hope for.
 

Rick Moquin

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... from a long debate that took place a few ions ago on IBC, high fired bonsai pots do not breathe whether glazed or not, to include but not limited to inside, outside or both. Low fired pots on the other hand will breathe and soak up moisture.

One thing that is not a myth is that roots are more apt to readily attached themselves to the sides and bottom of a non glazed pot. In the years of old when wire was not as common place compared to doay for securing trees in a pot, this assisted in anchoring the tree (once established). In this day and age, if it looks good and complements the tree, use it.

Nice first batch of pots:)
 
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