First Pot

Alex DeRuiter

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Just made this last week in my Introduction to Pottery class. I went a little wild with the blue, but I thought it looked kinda neat. Thoughts? ;)
 

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Alex DeRuiter

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Haha, its intended purpose!

I really didn't make it to use as a bonsai pot, but for some reason it just looks like it could make a fun tropical or something. I dunno ;-p
 

Smoke

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My wife has something similer in the bathroom with powder and a puff in it!

At least it has function though. Donkey Bop!
 

Ross

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If it weren't so bright and busy, maybe a muted and earthy brown, it wouldn't be all that bad! As a rule though, bonsai pots are never glazed on the inside. I think it keeps the tree from slipping and sliding around. I can't see the bottom, but remember some big drainage holes, and maybe a couple small holes for anchoring tie-down wire.
 

Alex DeRuiter

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Smoke, speaking of powder puffs, I think a powder puff (calliandra haematocephala) might look good in the pot. lol

What's a Donkey Bop? haha

Ross, thank you for the info! I was always curious as to why they didn't glaze the inside of the pots. I agree completely about the colors. I actually didn't make it for a bonsai pot so I could use it for my assignment (it's a college course), and thus didn't include drainage holes. However, I just liked how it came out, so I think I may use it. I ended up drilling holes a couple days ago.

Thanks for the input :D
 

Smoke

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Smoke, speaking of powder puffs, I think a powder puff (calliandra haematocephala) might look good in the pot. lol

What's a Donkey Bop? haha

Ross, thank you for the info! I was always curious as to why they didn't glaze the inside of the pots. I agree completely about the colors. I actually didn't make it for a bonsai pot so I could use it for my assignment (it's a college course), and thus didn't include drainage holes. However, I just liked how it came out, so I think I may use it. I ended up drilling holes a couple days ago.

Thanks for the input :D

I grew up in Sanger Cal., a suburb of Fresno. This is where Mama Yamaguchi grew the fabulous Awagi Pines I wrote about. One of my childhood heros was Milt Minter. He was a race car driver and famous all over the world. I raced motercycles with all of his nephews in grammer and high school.

The story of Donkey Bop is here
 

IdahoDR

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I grew up in Sanger Cal., a suburb of Fresno. This is where Mama Yamaguchi grew the fabulous Awagi Pines I wrote about. One of my childhood heros was Milt Minter. He was a race car driver and famous all over the world. I raced motercycles with all of his nephews in grammer and high school.

The story of Donkey Bop is here

I was born and raised in Fresno =D. Sorry my post is off topic.
 

Vance Wood

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I guess the really important thing here is whether or not you plan on continuing to make pots and have access to a kiln to fire them in. If so you need to fire them, from what I understand from people in the business, at a minimum of cone 10 or you will not achieve the amount of hardness for the pot to survive winters outdoors. I envy anyone who has the opportunity to do this. There have been so many incidents of not being able to find the "Just Right" pot for a particular tree because it just does not exist, or-----if you do find the "Just Right" pot you cannot afford to buy it without mortgaging your home. Either way you should cultivate a relationship with the professor and learn beyond your class requirements.
 

Alex DeRuiter

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I guess the really important thing here is whether or not you plan on continuing to make pots and have access to a kiln to fire them in. If so you need to fire them, from what I understand from people in the business, at a minimum of cone 10 or you will not achieve the amount of hardness for the pot to survive winters outdoors. I envy anyone who has the opportunity to do this. There have been so many incidents of not being able to find the "Just Right" pot for a particular tree because it just does not exist, or-----if you do find the "Just Right" pot you cannot afford to buy it without mortgaging your home. Either way you should cultivate a relationship with the professor and learn beyond your class requirements.

Already on my way to the top of the class. lol -- She told me she actually had a few students who were interested in making bonsai pots, and they still come back to fire their pots. I remember reading something like you must fire at like 1,200 degrees Celcius so that the clay isn't porous. I know kilns can be extremely expensive, so it will be necessary to fire at the school for a while. But yeah, I plan on making this a long-term thing.
 
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