Fixing a Field Maple Stump

heeclee

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
30
Location
Central Maryland
I dug up a field maple stump that was planted some years ago. When I started digging, what I though was the base of the tree (red line) just had 3 roots, and the true base was even lower.
Is there a safe way to fix that bulge (black arrow) created by the higher roots? Will grinding away with dremel be safe for the tree?

20220306_113258_LI.jpg

Also, because I chopped it long time ago, and didn't take care of it, it now has a large rotting hole? at the chop site. What is the best way to prevent it from getting bigger and deeper? Thank you,
20220306_113314 (2).jpg
 

Shibui

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,094
Reaction score
9,683
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
I think only time will fix that lower reverse taper. You could try wounding below the wider part to get callus to accelerate thickening on the low section. Some people have hammered the bark, I've tried cutting vertical slits in the section that needs to be thickened. It does work but not instant.
This is one of the problems with leaving trees in the ground without checking. I've found maples and junipers in particular are very fond of putting out new surface roots if planted too deep and thickening is really quick where new roots grow.
You still have the same thing in the upper trunk which will be harder to fix.

The hollow cannot heal over a void. You can try filling the hole with something solid and durable. The bark should grow over provided it has a solid surface.
Alternative is to make a feature of the hollow - called uro in Japanese.
Hollow trunk is not fatal for trees. Check some of the old redwoods that have lived for many years with completely hollow trunks. Other smaller forest trees have hollow trunks that provide homes for owls, etc so hollow trunk is a natural part of aging for trees.
 

Mellow Mullet

Masterpiece
Messages
3,732
Reaction score
10,237
Location
Mobile, Alabama-The Heart of Dixie
USDA Zone
8-9
Don't know what it looks like all the way around, but it looks to me like you could remove the "bumps" with knob cutters and it would be smoother and the taper issue would be less noticeable. As for the hollow, clean out the punky wood, fill it with epoxy putty up to where you want it to heal over. The callous will roll right over the epoxy putty.

Here is an article that I wrote on my website:

 

Tieball

Masterpiece
Messages
2,481
Reaction score
2,430
Location
Michigan. 6a
USDA Zone
6a
I've used the attached product to fill in a deep hole like you have. This will kneed to a medium soft putty clay consistency that can be formed as I want. It sticks to the surface edges well and dries very hard. Conveniently it is also a pleasant color when dry that blends well into my tree trunk colors. Not expensive at all. I cut off and kneed what I require and save the rest in the tube to use some other day….sometimes years later.
7D90D0AD-1EF3-41A9-9D83-A3D729D226A3.jpeg
 

heeclee

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
30
Location
Central Maryland
Thanks for the tips and the article guys. I remember using grey JB Weld putty for a cracked pvc pipe. I will try the wood color one. Thanks again.
 

Tbrshou

Mame
Messages
247
Reaction score
238
Location
Hampton Ga
USDA Zone
8a/
You could ground layer at the red lines and make that your new base and keep the flare. Fill the hole with jb weld as Tieball said and reactivate the callous around the hole by scraping off the top layer add cut past and wait
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Drjd Fixing the apex General Discussion 2
GailC "fixing" a ginseng ficus? Tropicals 25
Boscology Fixing scars on my chinese elm Elms 7
T Fixing chips and cracks Pots 6
mattspiniken A Field Grown Larch Other Conifers 8

Similar threads

Top Bottom