[FL] I'm in a 9a, flat/no-mountain area, are there *any* practical conifers I can go hunting for (besides BC's) *in nature*?

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#1
As title states I'm hoping to learn which species, if any, of conifer(s) would be appropriate to collect in FL! I'm in the Tampa Bay area and very, very badly want to collect conifers (that aren't BC's) but my only "option" in-mind is to "finally find that score" of a shopping-plaza or home-owner who has a mature in-ground specimen that they'd let me take.....I've been at this for >2yrs now and that situation hasn't happened yet so, while I am going to be doing more door-knocking to hopefully get an OK for someone's mature, in-ground yardadori (ideally the largest juniper I can find, would be looking, basically, just for a great trunk & first-primary-branch low enough on that trunk)

Thanks a ton for any suggestions, tips or thoughts on this! Happy gardening everybody!!!! :)
 
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#2
There is really no native conifer to this area that is good for bonsai. Virginia pine is about the only thing and its really found a bit more north. The best option is to collect a decent piece of juniper material trunk wise from a landscape or commercial installation and graft good foliage to it.
 
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#4
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#5
https://www.bonsaimary.com/pine-bonsai-tree.html

The artist on that page has a goofy slash pine that I quite like. It isn’t naturalistic by any means but I like the “weeping” character of it.
Slash appears like character from Lil Abner comic strip. Hiroshima pine looks like atom bomb going off;).
 
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#6
I've collected seedlings off the Yellow Pine in my yard that I am trying to keep going (2 years so far). They look like Truffula trees now. Keep in mind that most true native pines really don't take well to transplanting and not at all to bare rooting.
 
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#9
There is really no native conifer to this area that is good for bonsai. Virginia pine is about the only thing and its really found a bit more north. The best option is to collect a decent piece of juniper material trunk wise from a landscape or commercial installation and graft good foliage to it.
Thanks! Dumb Q but how large of a graft is reasonable to depend upon, for instance can I find a great trunk on a 3' tall juniper in a parking lot, but this trunk doesn't have *any* lower branches.....can I depend on 'installing' a low branch (that'd likely become my leader down the road)? Is it more-often a thread-graft from the same specimen or same cultivar, or an approach-graft from a diff specimen of same cultivar?

Really appreciate this! I'd been looking at topology maps after watching a video w/ Bjorn recently and hearing how he "can just head out to the mountains to grab hundreds-year-old material", that's how it is here for me w/ bougie/crape/cypress (well, not hundreds of years but mature), really got me eager....the 'hurdle' of getting someone to give-up a mature yardadori shouldn't be too-bad, am in a spot right now where I can offer significant enough replacement-specimen if it helps seal the deal, but there's one massive thing I'm unsure of in this regard: what type(s) of Junipers should I look for? I know (i think!) that I should be avoiding the tall / tree types, and that that leaves the 'prostrate' (low-lying but not a creeper) types and the creeper/ground-cover types.....my understanding is the 'prostrate' ones, that aren't trees but aren't ground-covers, are where you wanna be, but I'm unsure if ground-cover ones are also valid specimen to be searching for too?

Thanks a ton, there's a handful of spots (residential & commercial) where, for months, I've been trying to "build rapport" so I can eventually make the proposition, but not knowing when the best time-of-year is or whether I strictly need prostrate-type cultivars, has had me dragging my feet! Again thanks a ton now I'm stoked to go make this happen, I just recently got my first real 'mature' ficus and expect to get this new juniper sometime soon (if it's the season, I now nothing of coniferous stuff sadly, have to google for anything if it's not a BC!)
 
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#10
I was going to say Loblolly is the only one I know of (being from the opposite corner of the country.)

Having seen the one in Markyscott's post in person it will make an impressive bonsai, since that pix it has been HBRed and is back budding like crazy.

It is very reminisent of Japanese Red Pine with regard to needle size and texture, and the bark is pretty darn good too.
 
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#11
Thanks! Dumb Q but how large of a graft is reasonable to depend upon, for instance can I find a great trunk on a 3' tall juniper in a parking lot, but this trunk doesn't have *any* lower branches.....can I depend on 'installing' a low branch (that'd likely become my leader down the road)? Is it more-often a thread-graft from the same specimen or same cultivar, or an approach-graft from a diff specimen of same cultivar?

Really appreciate this! I'd been looking at topology maps after watching a video w/ Bjorn recently and hearing how he "can just head out to the mountains to grab hundreds-year-old material", that's how it is here for me w/ bougie/crape/cypress (well, not hundreds of years but mature), really got me eager....the 'hurdle' of getting someone to give-up a mature yardadori shouldn't be too-bad, am in a spot right now where I can offer significant enough replacement-specimen if it helps seal the deal, but there's one massive thing I'm unsure of in this regard: what type(s) of Junipers should I look for? I know (i think!) that I should be avoiding the tall / tree types, and that that leaves the 'prostrate' (low-lying but not a creeper) types and the creeper/ground-cover types.....my understanding is the 'prostrate' ones, that aren't trees but aren't ground-covers, are where you wanna be, but I'm unsure if ground-cover ones are also valid specimen to be searching for too?

Thanks a ton, there's a handful of spots (residential & commercial) where, for months, I've been trying to "build rapport" so I can eventually make the proposition, but not knowing when the best time-of-year is or whether I strictly need prostrate-type cultivars, has had me dragging my feet! Again thanks a ton now I'm stoked to go make this happen, I just recently got my first real 'mature' ficus and expect to get this new juniper sometime soon (if it's the season, I now nothing of coniferous stuff sadly, have to google for anything if it's not a BC!)
You'll be looking for trees that have sufficient branching in place as you will mostly be replacing foliage not grafting branching. You look for small powerful trees with low movement and branching and good nebari.
 
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Location
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#12
I was going to say Loblolly is the only one I know of (being from the opposite corner of the country.)

Having seen the one in Markyscott's post in person it will make an impressive bonsai, since that pix it has been HBRed and is back budding like crazy.

It is very reminisent of Japanese Red Pine with regard to needle size and texture, and the bark is pretty darn good too.
Loblolly is an interesting tree. I’ve worked with them a bit and others here work with them a lot. They are a multi flush pine, so we’ve treated them like black pine. They bud back much better then JBP on old wood. Tend to grow stick straight outdoors, but if you can find one with movement/taper it has promise in bonsai culture. That’s a nice one at Hagedorn’s place.

S
 

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