Forbidden Yamadori: Japanese privet

DaveG

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There are about thirty or so of what I'm pretty sure are Japanese privet (Ligustrum japonicum) planted around our apartment complex. More and more, I get tempted by the notion to ask if the owners would let me know when they finally decide to rip them out and let me collect at least one or two of the trunks. I believe all of these are roughly 40 years old. So anyway, I thought I'd share some pictures, just to let the rest of you see what I look at every day.

(post 1 of 3)
 

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DaveG

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(post 2 of 3)
 

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DaveG

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(post 3 of 3)
 

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No, it's mine. I saw it first. Well, second maybe.

Wait a second.. aren't I in the middle of developing a TEN STEP program to STOP you from buying/acquiring more trees??

Let's not think about the fact that I am an enabler considering I have offered to proxy bid for you at the auction...LMAO... :D :D :D

V
 

DaveG

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I suppose there are a few questions I have too:

* What sort of thing would an experienced collector usually offer to the owners of the property to get them to part with a couple of these trunks? It should be kept in mind that individual plants aren't usually considered precious here, as they impatiently rip out plants that are recovering from frost damage, but also that these specific bushes, as ugly as they're kept, are probably considered integral to the decorating scheme of the property. I've considered offering newer matching plants for a few that are "rotting" so I can use them in my "art." But I'm not sure if this is the best approach.

* If I got them to agree to let me have a couple, I'd be better off digging them out sooner rather than later so they don't get impatient and rip them out themselves or just change their minds. (Also, I'm moving 6 hours north within the next 2 months.) Is it very difficult to move older privet in the summer without damaging it too much or simply killing it?

There was one more picture I had that I didn't upload with the rest because it was overly large. I've resized and cropped it to bring a little more attention to its important feature, which is a bunch of roots growing downward through a hollow area. I'm not even sure I'd pick this one to take, but there's just something I really like about that feature.
 

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Let me remind you of the 10th commandment: Thou shall not covet thy nieghbor's wife nor his privet.

That's very funny... :D made me actually laugh out loud. I mean seriously... for all the times we say LOL how often do we actually do it????? it's rare... that was a real - honest to goodness - laugh out loud moment. :D

Well Done!

V
 

bonsai barry

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I've been nervous about approaching people to remove their trees or shrubs because of liability. What if they accuse me of damage to the property? Or Water line etc.
 

rockm

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"What if they accuse me of damage to the property? Or Water line etc. "

Best thing to do is to remind them that to take the plant out safely, it will require a call to the local "miss utility" line--which will send someone out to mark electrical, water and gas lines for free.

The property damage issue is tough. My rule of thumb is "if the owners seems like a pain in the butt, he probably is a pain in the butt and not worth the trouble...even if he has a spectacular dwarfed maple in the front yard he keeps hitting with the lawn mower." Avoid him or her or them.:D

Most people, however, aren't pains in the butt --IF you're careful. They are, after all, getting a tree removed for free.
 

donkey

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some of my gardening customers want me to remove tree's and today i got a triple trunked forsythia each trunk around 3 - 4 inches thick and i was paid £40 to take it :D when my camera/computer problems are sorted i will upload a pic
 

Bonsai Nut

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Back your car over one of them, then approach the owners, apologize, and offer to replace it at your cost. Then, when the new (beautiful) bush is in place say "you know, it looks so nice maybe I can swap out the rest of these old bushes for new ones, too :)"
 
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I suppose there are a few questions I have too:

* What sort of thing would an experienced collector usually offer to the owners of the property to get them to part with a couple of these trunks? It should be kept in mind that individual plants aren't usually considered precious here, as they impatiently rip out plants that are recovering from frost damage, but also that these specific bushes, as ugly as they're kept, are probably considered integral to the decorating scheme of the property. I've considered offering newer matching plants for a few that are "rotting" so I can use them in my "art." But I'm not sure if this is the best approach.

* If I got them to agree to let me have a couple, I'd be better off digging them out sooner rather than later so they don't get impatient and rip them out themselves or just change their minds. (Also, I'm moving 6 hours north within the next 2 months.) Is it very difficult to move older privet in the summer without damaging it too much or simply killing it?

There was one more picture I had that I didn't upload with the rest because it was overly large. I've resized and cropped it to bring a little more attention to its important feature, which is a bunch of roots growing downward through a hollow area. I'm not even sure I'd pick this one to take, but there's just something I really like about that feature.

Cash is always good... along with a replacement... but like I told you earlier today in chat... Go to some depressed neighborhoods... you'd be suprised at how many cool neglected trees there are, and how much the folks would likely appreciate the funds. ;)

It is risky to do it now... period. There's no way to feel confident... so if you do get them... make sure you keep them in a very shady place.

And this last one isn't bad either, though I wish I could see the basal flare more.

V
 

jersanct

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I have collected several old (for the US) landscape yews and junipers over the past few years, and I haven't paid a cent to collect any of them. Once or twice I bought a bag of topsoil at Home Depot to fill in the holes, but that's it. In many cases, I think owners of older houses with old boring foundation plantings of yew and juniper, and sometimes old hedges, as well, do not really like them, and they are thrilled if someone will wrestle them out of the ground at no cost to themselves. So, only offer money as a last resort.

As for your question about digging up privets in the summer: Our summer weather in St. Louis probably isn't quite as brutal as yours in Texas, but it is pretty brutal. I dug out an entire old privet hedge in July last year; I didn't have time to pot all of them up immediately, so some just lived in their little clumps of collected dirt--in full sun--for weeks. One of them is still just sitting in its clump of collected dirt, nearly a year later, still in full sun, and it looks perfectly happy. I think it may be nearly impossible to kill these things. Give it a shot, especially if you can't wait until a more appropriate collecting time for your area.
 

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