Forest of What Type of Pines ?

mrchips1952

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Next spring I would like to do a forest but unsure what type of pines are easiest to work with and the most hardy. I live in Colorado Springs at 6,100 feet if that makes any difference. I would like to buy nursery stock. What does everyone recommend? Thanks ! Dave in Colorado Springs.:D
 

mrchips1952

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Thanks Dave. I know spring is a long time away but I am already making a list of what bonsai projects I want to undertake.
 

Dav4

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Thanks Dave. I know spring is a long time away but I am already making a list of what bonsai projects I want to undertake.

...and what you'll want to have around when you undertake those projects, I hope. It's a great idea to plan ahead and get everything you need BEFORE you need them, like wire, screens, soil components, different sized pots, etc. With a forest planting, tree size and spacing between, and placement of the individual trees is very important, so do your homework. By the way, March isn't that far off, really. Good luck,

Dave
 

Vance Wood

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If you will buy nursery stock, I'm thinking you should look at mugo pine.

Dave

Far be it from me to suggest that Mugo Pine is a bad choice but in this case it is, especially if you are trying to make a forest planting. Mugos tend to grow in ways that are totally contrary to a forest setting. This is particularly obvious if you choose to find your material in a nursery. Scots would be a far better choice. Contrary to what may be said Scots do quite well almost anywhere. Scots Pine is one of the most widely distributed species of Pine on the Planet, they grow from the South of France to near the Arctic Circle.

I know there are some native species that have been suggested but with the exception of Lodge Pole/ Shore Pine, things like Ponderosa have needle lengths that are too long. If you decide to go with a domestic species it is difficult to find something better than Spruce. Usually a forest is made of straight trunks arranged in a particular manner to render the impression of a forest scene. Spruce fit this category nicely.

The real problem with finding appropriate material for a forest is finding the right material which is usually straight and underdeveloped. A Christmas Tree Farm may be a good place to locate liners, the type of material you need to find. A traditional nursery may not be a good place to find this stuff.
 

Dav4

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After reading Vance's reponse, I have to agree that Mugos would not be ideal candidates for a forest planting...I mentioned it as they are a readlily available pine that is hardy in CO. If you must have an evergreen forest planting, then the dwarf alberta spruce would be the best subject, and the easiest to find at typical retail nurseries.
 

mrchips1952

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After plowing through all my bonsai books last night I think you have hit the nail on the head...dwarf Alberta Spruce. The needles are short and compact and I know I will be able to find these at Home Depot next spring or our local nursery. Thanks guys !
 

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