Fresh from the grow bed

Jay Wilson

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Here's another florida elm that I pulled from the grow bed a few days ago. I don't know yet where I'm going with this one.
Jay
 

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Tachigi

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In the greenhouse I have Casuarina, Boggies, and Ficus all collected from Florida.

I want one of these. (OK, I'll fess up... maybe two)

Jay give us a little dissertation on the attributes of this tree.
 

bonsai barry

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It's a good looking trunk with a lot of interest. I'm curious about the guy wires, are they simply anchoring the tree in the pot? If so, is there an advantage of wiring to the higher parts of the tree. I would have satisfied to wire around the roots and the lower trunk.

It's anchored as if you expect a lot of hurricanes in your area.
 

Jay Wilson

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Barry,
Yes, most of the guy wires are just to anchor the tree. No advantage other than it's quick any easy.

Well.. it also makes it easy to adjust the planting angle. I put a layer of soil on the bottom of the box, place the tree and wire it down. I get the tree tight where I want it and fill in the rest of the way.

I guess another thing would be, by tying the tree up higher it's held very firmly when I use guy wires to pull branches and manipulate branches ( a couple of wires on this tree are pulling branches).

I only do this in training/grow boxes....After a few months the tree anchors itself in the box and the wires come off.

In a bonsai pot I also would secure the tree by wiring the roots in the pot.

Jay
 

grog

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I know where you're going with this tree. You're taking it down to the post office and sending it next day delivery to me!

Seriously, I would also like to hear more about your experiences with these trees as they are pretty darn close to the same thing as the american elms growing around here. Ours have coarser growth I believe but much of their care should be similar. Thanks!
 

John Hill

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Nice tree Jay!! I look forward to its development. You have done a fantastic job so far. Love to see it in leaf also.

A Friend in bonsai
John
 

Jay Wilson

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Hey Tom and Grog,
Thanks for your interest. I do like these trees myself.
I started to write some things that I've experienced with FL. Elms but so far I've only managed to come up with a disjointed ramble.....
I'll smooth it out in the next day or so and post it.

Thanks John,
I think this will be an enjoyable tree to work on. I'll keep you posted as things progress.

Jay
 
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Jay--I like your elm, hope you don't mind if I took the liberty to personalize it a bit...the top was looking a bit like a stovepipe so I reduced it a bit. These are fast growers where you are, right? I don't think a reduction like this would harm it. I would also shorten the lower branches and see if you can get some buds to pop to the sides as they are pretty vertical right now. Good luck with your tree.
 

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Jay Wilson

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Greg,

I don't mind at all your taking liberties with my tree...just have it home by midnight ;)

Seriously though, thanks for your thoughts.You are right on track with what I also see as areas that need work.That stovepipe bothers me too. I've already started pulling the side branches down with guy wires. They were nearly straight against the trunk when I dug it.

These do grow fast and pop buds most everywhere, so for now I'm going to let it grow free to recover from digging and the root work.

Jay
 
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Jay--I like your elm, hope you don't mind if I took the liberty to personalize it a bit...the top was looking a bit like a stovepipe so I reduced it a bit. These are fast growers where you are, right? I don't think a reduction like this would harm it. I would also shorten the lower branches and see if you can get some buds to pop to the sides as they are pretty vertical right now. Good luck with your tree.

I did the same thing before I finished reading the thread. I wonder, Greg, why you chose to move the trunk line further to the right? Not saying it wouldn't have possiblilities, but my first inclination would have been to the left. Of course, depending on branching and budding, toward the front would be acceptable too, or any angle between.
 

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Chris--what you've done is the correct thing, I just did a quick and dirty. Maybe it was just enough to the back I didn't think it was a good position for the new leader. I chose the one on the right because it looked best for the transition in taper and its place on the trunk. The tree could aslo be rotated counter-clockwise slightly so that the leader I chose leaned slightly toward the viewer.
 

Bonsai Nut

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depending on branching and budding, toward the front would be acceptable too, or any angle between.
I think it would be interesting to develop this as a twin trunk. You would probably keep the small trunk on the right, and it would help as you planned the development of the main trunk. Additionally, it will help develop the base, and you can always remove it later - just airlayer it off and use it in a forest planting. You really really want a bud to pop on the lower left edge of the trunk chop scar.

I agree with Chris - especially if you go twin trunk and keep the right trunk. You need to chop the upper trunk section again and go left - it is too straight and uniform.
 

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