From Seed Division: TinyArt’s Texas Ebony Forest

TinyArt

Shohin
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did they come up?
Thank you for asking --
I have to confess that I haven't started them.

Plans and circumstances keep shifting -- at first, I thought I'd better wait, rather than leave seed(ling)s in someone else's care -- but now with Delta running rampant here, I guess I'll get back to work.

Pictures when planted, and sprouting! 🙂
 

LindaPat

Seedling
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I like Texas Mahogany. Saw some Mahogany (not Really mahogany which is tropical I think) inColorado and thought it would be a beauty as bonsai. But I think it grows slowly. Haven’t seen any place to buy a bush.
 

TinyArt

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I like Texas Mahogany. Saw some Mahogany (not Really mahogany which is tropical I think) inColorado and thought it would be a beauty as bonsai. But I think it grows slowly. Haven’t seen any place to buy a bush.
These are Ebenopsis ebano, Texas Ebony -- formerly known as Pithecellobium flexicaule, according to Brooklyn Botanic Garden's Growing Bonsai Indoors, 2013 edition. (A helpful book, as I'm new to bonsai and need to hedge my bets with species that are likeliest to tolerate my climate and my care...🙂)

More on the species:

{if my ISP stays online...}
 

Atrox

Mame
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This is a bit more recent of the tall one, it is about 20 years old from seed. The "Oak" stile is about 15, from seed. Here in Tucson these grow fairly fast with good drainage and lots of water. They volunteer here occasionally, big plants to trees produce tons of seeds, but to ensure germination one must nick the seed, then, for me, they are about 50%. The tall one grew in the ground for 10 years before I started to work on it. The other about 5. Wasn't doing bonsai then.

Thorney! but worth it. If one is sure that a new branch will not be needed the thorns can be cut very close, sometimes they will throw a leaf there again but not usually. With the zig zag growth clip and grow works as well as bending if one goes slow. I let them both go crazy for a few months then deleaf enough to see what I am doing for new major work. DSCF1829.JPG
.DSCF1828.JPG
 

TinyArt

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@Atrox -- thanks, this is exciting!
Mine exist only as potential -- but seeing the scale of the foliage, the character of the bark, etc., etc., of yours, I'm really encouraged!

Glad you mentioned ground-growing. I have a planter with excellent drainage, and have had thoughts of laying tiles in it, with suitable soil layered over it. There's plenty of room to experiment --

But that leads me to a new question: were your young seedlings getting direct sunlight, or were they safer as "understory" plants at first?
 

Atrox

Mame
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Here in Tucson seedlings of any kind need shade cloth for a year sometimes. Also we have sooooo many Quail that anything tasty is eaten soon as it comes up. Our rains just started but before that we had 6 weeks of 100+ and very low humidity. As you can see I really don't grow "bonsai" hahahaha I just enjoy working with the trees and shrubs to grow just literally "little trees" I also work with a tree that here is called hackberry , manzanita, createsolid brush ,mountain mahogany, Palo Verde.
 

TinyArt

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I just enjoy working with the trees and shrubs to grow just literally "little trees" I also work with a tree that here is called hackberry , manzanita, createsolid brush ,mountain mahogany, Palo Verde.
🤨 *hands on hips*
...And why do I not see your entries in the Native Tree/Native Pot threads???
Pretty please, show us your trees! 😀
 

LindaPat

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I believe this is the “mahogany “ I saw in Colorado, mountain mahogany. https://blog.twoknobbytires.com/2008/12/11/true-mountain-mahogany-cercocarpus/
Here is another of the three cercocarpus species:
 

TinyArt

Shohin
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@LindaPat time to get some mahogany for yourself, and start a thread or two! 😀


 
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