Full Fert after Root Work/Collection Myth

Messages
226
Reaction score
3
Location
Santa Cruz, CA
USDA Zone
8
Supposedly the freshly cut roots will burn? How can this possibly be. I use a High N fert right after the repot because High N relative to P has been shown to enhance root activity. This would put all those high P / B1 "transplant" products out of business if the word got out I guess.

Common sense says that after bare rooting and trimming roots the tree would be in a more deficient state than it was before and it would be very important to fertilize at full strength afterwords with high N (most easily flushed).

Myths to debunk here:

1. Fertilizing right after root work or collecting is bad.
2. High P low N eases transplant shock.

I am postulating that just the opposite practice eases the shock.

Off to work now...

Ael be Bock
 

Rick Moquin

Omono
Messages
1,245
Reaction score
9
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
... I believe from Colin Lewis

Nitrogen
Nitrogen is responsible for shoot development and foliage production, in short, for growth.
Too little nitrogen results in the plants failure to thrive and will have small possibly distorted leaves and a washed out insipid appearance. With no nitrogen at all, a large plant could die within the year. Too much nitrogen by contrast causes rapid growth, with large leaves and plump shoots that are full of water and consequently, are easy to snap.

Phosphorous
Phosphorous is essential for the development and proper functioning of roots. It is commonly used in high concentrations for newly potted stock plants and commercial root crops. Phosphorous also encourages the fattening of woody trunks and branches. It helps establish appropriate conditions for the production of foliage and flower buds. It also enhances the resistance of plant stress and disease. Weak growth and a pale colour may be the result of an oversupply, or even a lack of phosphorous.

Potassium
Potassium is the main ingredient in the production of fruit and flowers. Increasing potassium in the diet of bonsai apples and azaleas which fruit or flower poorly, will greatly improve their performance the next spring. Potassium also helps in hardening off late growth in preparation for winter. Insufficient potassium in non-flowering trees, results in winter die back. A cheap way to add potassium to the soil is to throw a few handfuls of hard wood ash onto the surface.

I use 10-52-10 at 1/2 strength on a repot,( after bare rooting new trees) etc... followed by full strength 2 weeks later with gret success. It may or may not work, but it makes me feel good...
 
Last edited:

Walter Pall

Masterpiece
Messages
2,575
Reaction score
12,391
Location
south of Munich, Germany
USDA Zone
7b
I fertilize EVERYTHING (including collected and recently repotted trees) about every ten days to two weeks during the active vegetation period. I believe that this is good for collected stuff as well as for repotted plants. I have learned this from Brent many years ago and do this since many years now. I use exactly the same fertilizer with the same strenght with all trees. I pour the water with nutrients all over collected trees because I think I help them through foliar feeding. The water flows all over the pot and then then I have the regular feeding of roots together with foliar feeding.
 

greerhw

Omono
Messages
1,978
Reaction score
13
I fertilize EVERYTHING (including collected and recently repotted trees) about every ten days to two weeks during the active vegetation period. I believe that this is good for collected stuff as well as for repotted plants. I have learned this from Brent many years ago and do this since many years now. I use exactly the same fertilizer with the same strenght with all trees. I pour the water with nutrients all over collected trees because I think I help them through foliar feeding. The water flows all over the pot and then then I have the regular feeding of roots together with foliar feeding.
WHAT !, Walter Pall, one of most admired bonsai masters on the planet believes in foliar feeding, Oh crap Will, what will you have to say about that.

Harry
 

greerhw

Omono
Messages
1,978
Reaction score
13
Does anyone use a time release fertilizer like Dynamite or Osmocote ?

Frank

I know people that use Osmocate on seedlings or small pre bonsai, but not on larger trained trees.

Harry
 

Ang3lfir3

Omono
Messages
1,287
Reaction score
17
Location
Bremerton, WA
USDA Zone
8b
Does anyone use a time release fertilizer like Dynamite or Osmocote ?

Frank
I have added Osmocote to my soil mixes in the past..... Its partly a pain to add it and mix it in to the soil (plus as it melts it will cause settling) so I have decided to stop using it and simply continue to fertilize normally... Tho i do still mix some into the soil of my flower beds....
 

ghues

Omono
Messages
1,340
Reaction score
2,249
Location
Campbell River BC Canada
USDA Zone
7b
Does anyone use a time release fertilizer like Dynamite or Osmocote ?

Frank

For established plants/trees = yes with great results. Have not tried it on freshly root pruned or collected stock. They are a time released fertilizer (coating around the fert is of various thicknesses), triggered by moisture and temp (i.e. it is most active during our growing season in the PNW) so I'm not sure...... again it might be fine depending on time of year?!!....perhaps others have more concrete evidence based on their own exeriences.
Gman
 
Last edited:

tombeur

Yamadori
Messages
55
Reaction score
0
Location
Ottawa, Canada
USDA Zone
5a
... I believe from Colin Lewis

Nitrogen
Nitrogen is responsible for shoot development and foliage production, in short, for growth.
Too little nitrogen results in the plants failure to thrive and will have small possibly distorted leaves and a washed out insipid appearance. With no nitrogen at all, a large plant could die within the year. Too much nitrogen by contrast causes rapid growth, with large leaves and plump shoots that are full of water and consequently, are easy to snap.

Phosphorous
Phosphorous is essential for the development and proper functioning of roots. It is commonly used in high concentrations for newly potted stock plants and commercial root crops. Phosphorous also encourages the fattening of woody trunks and branches. It helps establish appropriate conditions for the production of foliage and flower buds. It also enhances the resistance of plant stress and disease. Weak growth and a pale colour may be the result of an oversupply, or even a lack of phosphorous.

Potassium
Potassium is the main ingredient in the production of fruit and flowers. Increasing potassium in the diet of bonsai apples and azaleas which fruit or flower poorly, will greatly improve their performance the next spring. Potassium also helps in hardening off late growth in preparation for winter. Insufficient potassium in non-flowering trees, results in winter die back. A cheap way to add potassium to the soil is to throw a few handfuls of hard wood ash onto the surface.

I use 10-52-10 at 1/2 strength on a repot,( after bare rooting new trees) etc... followed by full strength 2 weeks later with gret success. It may or may not work, but it makes me feel good...

I do what Rick does - because he taught me that on another board and it seems to work - certainly it does no harm. I even do it with rooted cuttings.

Cheers,

Steve
 

Similar threads

Top