Future yamadori-projects (maybe)

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Just thought I'd post some possible yamadori (Pinus sylvestris). I might collect one or two of them next spring.

Edit: The yellow needles is because we had the hottest summer ever recorded. The two last ines are the same tree.
 

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The third is actually my nr 1 as well! I'm sure you've heard it before but it's way better in real life. It will be a nice literati double trunk in a couple of years hehe...
 

Tachigi

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#1 looks pretty tasty as well. You'd better have a grain silo for #4
 

Graydon

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Mmmph. Number one for sure. Gotta love a bend like that right above the ground. Where did you say they were located?
 
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Just thought I'd post some possible yamadori (Pinus sylvestris). I might collect one or two of them next spring.

Edit: The yellow needles is because we had the hottest summer ever recorded. The two last ines are the same tree.
Is your screen name in any way related to Monty Python's Flying Circus?
 
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KC said:

"Is your screen name in any way related to Monty Python's Flying Circus?"

No, it's not...:)
 
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Number 1 is not collectable, otherwise it would come home with me. It looks a lot like Mario Komstas Kokofu-ten(?) tree...or at least it could look like that with proper care. I think.

The last one is about 85-90 cm high.
 

Tachigi

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Number 1 is not collectable
Pleas elaborate, is it due to size, root spread, ground conditions?
 
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For two reasons:

1. The site: The rocks in the background is an burial site from the time of the Vikings. I doubt that I would get permission to alter the environment in any way. Even if I would get a permission, I'd rather see this spot as unchanged as possible. Perhaps totally unrational, but for ME it would be unethical to remove anything from this spot. Just a gut-feeling.

2. Ground conditions: It grows in a crevice. The trunk won't budge in any direction. A crowbar would be useless.
 

JasonG

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I would get them all except the first given your reasoning. If it were me I would still get it and style it in a Viking kinda way :)

The last 3 trees would make fine bonsai, and probably better than most anyone has in thier yard with exception of the notable names. The last one might become a landscape tree since it does look big, but it is a great tree.... Get them all, and have fun!!

Jason
 
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Jason said:

"Get them all, and have fun!!"

It's not Pokémon, you know!!! :)

I'm a bit "scared" of the last one. I usually only collect the ones I can pull right up without tools or anything and get the complete rootball. I'm not really used to the actual digging, but I've gotten a few pointers at other forum so I know it in theory (I've tried it on some smaller specimens but none of this size). Anyway, I'm not sure of the nebari, but if the roots look good I'll give it a try...
 

JasonG

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Regarding that big tree, just take your time and get what you can in the way of roots.

As for the nebari.... who cares? It is yamadori and that means the nebari doesn't matter like it would on a field grown tree. Yamadori are collected for their bark, twisty trunks, deadwood, age and power not for the nebari....Never!

If you get lucky and get a good nebari on a collected tree then the next 200 trees won't have a nebari, lol!! Good nebari on a collected conifer is very, very rare... I never look at the nebari when collecting, it is all about the trunk line and what you instantly see in the tree, or future tree.

Now go dig those 3 trees and lets see them in a grow box!!

Jason
 
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Sorry, I used the wrong words. I totally agree with you on the nebari-issue, on yamadori it's very nice bonus but don't count on it. The thing is that there is a risk that the roots grow waaay down below soil level (like 1' or more) and then I think it will be too big to collect. That is very common up here on boggy sites.

I'll dig one or two :))) when spring comes (middle of May, sub-artic climate 160km south of the artic circle), right now they're covered in 3' of snow!
 

Graydon

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The site: The rocks in the background is an burial site from the time of the Vikings. I doubt that I would get permission to alter the environment in any way. Even if I would get a permission, I'd rather see this spot as unchanged as possible. Perhaps totally unrational, but for ME it would be unethical to remove anything from this spot. Just a gut-feeling.
Cool! But wait a minute - I thought the Vikings had sea burials and all - place the body in a boat, set it a blaze and push it out to sea?

Well, if you can't dig it we can all appreciate the nice tree in the photos. Thanks again!
 

Tachigi

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Yamadori are collected for their bark, twisty trunks, deadwood, age and power not for the nebari....Never!
Jason, I have to disagree. You may not find great nebari on Yamadori, however the ones that do have it are valued highly and sought after. As for my own standards when collecting, I now only look for yamadori with all the attributes that make for a good tree. If I just collected for the trunk I would have to move off my property. By refining the collection process (as a non commercial entity) you refine your collection. Hence giving more time to fewer while creating better quality.

Just my perspective :)
 

JasonG

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Hey Tom,

I somewhat see what you are saying..... I was talking about conifers in general. From what I have seen the best trees are collected from the rocks, cracks in rocks or solid rock formations. In these cases 99.9% will not have a good nebari for bonsai but the bark, deadwood and twist trunks can't be found growing in dirt where you might have a better chance of getting good nebari.
I guess it all depends on where you collection is and what type of trees you need to further that collection. Decidious trees from the wild have better odds of getting a better nebari but then again that is limited to the growing and soil conditions.

I understand what you are saying about bieng selective for your personal collection.... but I am not going to pass up a world class tree (above the soil line) because the nebari might not be good either.

I have yet to see a picture of a collected conifer with a "good" nebari.....

My 2cents worth :)

Jason
 

Tachigi

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I guess it all depends on where you collection is and what type of trees you need to further that collection
A good point. The mountains of Oregon are a bit different than the Appalachians and trees do grow differently. Your point also makes me reflect on trips to the Rockies and the material gathered there.
 

t.scope

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get #2# its already cut down and looks like that it has a great nebari (for yamadori), enough dead wood and a flexible, posible new trunk. besides, from the spreading of the roots could be (you never know 'till you start digging :cool: ) easier to take it home.
happy digging, criss
 

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