gaia green organic 4-4-4 fertilizer

Jiminsauga

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Anyone have any experience with Gaia Green organic 4-4-4 all purpose fertilizer?

It's from BC Canada but you can get it pretty much at any LGC across Ontario.

It's derived from:
Feather meal, alfalfa meal, bone meal, blood meal, glacial rock dust, natural rock phosphate, fishbone meal, mineralized phosphate, potassium sulphate, insect frass, basalt rock dust, humic acid, gypsum, kelp meal, oyster shell flower, greensand.

All looks promising but wouldn't mind some feedback from some more experienced folks.

Here's a picture of what it looks like in the container from Google. Figured I could go the teabag route with a couple scoops in each.
DSC06487_2_grande.jpg

Website for full details:
 

sorce

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You probably wouldn't want it in a bonsai pot, unless you ...... teabag it.

Sorce
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Glacial Rock Dust - can you say ground limestone and other rocks. Calcium carbonates, calcites, various degrees of hardness of calcium carbonate minerals. Glacial till, which is the source of glacial rock dust, is a mix of sandstone, granites, shale, and limestone, all ground up by the glaciers. Depending on specific location quarried, it can be a fairly high percentage of ground limestone in the mix. I would assume at least 25% limestone, though each quarry is different.

Ground Gypsum - this is calcium sulfate. Sulfates and sulfur are much needed nutrients. The sulfate is good, the calcium is good for most trees, except it can contribute to a calcium excess, IF you have multiple sources of calcium.

Calcium is a needed nutrient, EXCEPT, if your irrigation water is already high in calcium. If your municipal water or well water is over 300 ppm total dissolved solids, or over 275 mg/liter total alkalinity, you are already giving your trees enough calcium for most species simply by using well water or municipal water 3 times a week. Pines, junipers, elms, Malus species and hybrids, Crataegus, Cotoneaster, and many many other trees will appreciate the calcium in this fertilizer. FOR MOST TREES this is not a problem.

Azalea, Rhododendron and Blueberry (Vaccinium species) are very efficient at harvesting calcium from their environment and have no "off switch", for calcium uptake. They can be damaged by excess calcium in their soils, water and fertilizer.

So look at your soil, water and fertilizer, figure out how much calcium you are getting. You might not want to be adding additional calcium in the fertilizer.

If you are collecting and using rain water to water your trees, you definitely do need to add calcium for most if not all your trees, even the azalea. So depending on your watering methods, this fertilizer is either really good or maybe not so good.

I know this is not a "YES" or a "NO", just giving you the things to think about when looking at this as a "maybe". For my Lake Michigan municipal water, I would go ahead and use this for all my trees except the azalea, and blueberries.
 

Jiminsauga

Sapling
Messages
45
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Location
Ontario, 🇨🇦
USDA Zone
5a
Glacial Rock Dust - can you say ground limestone and other rocks. Calcium carbonates, calcites, various degrees of hardness of calcium carbonate minerals. Glacial till, which is the source of glacial rock dust, is a mix of sandstone, granites, shale, and limestone, all ground up by the glaciers. Depending on specific location quarried, it can be a fairly high percentage of ground limestone in the mix. I would assume at least 25% limestone, though each quarry is different.

Ground Gypsum - this is calcium sulfate. Sulfates and sulfur are much needed nutrients. The sulfate is good, the calcium is good for most trees, except it can contribute to a calcium excess, IF you have multiple sources of calcium.

Calcium is a needed nutrient, EXCEPT, if your irrigation water is already high in calcium. If your municipal water or well water is over 300 ppm total dissolved solids, or over 275 mg/liter total alkalinity, you are already giving your trees enough calcium for most species simply by using well water or municipal water 3 times a week. Pines, junipers, elms, Malus species and hybrids, Crataegus, Cotoneaster, and many many other trees will appreciate the calcium in this fertilizer. FOR MOST TREES this is not a problem.

Azalea, Rhododendron and Blueberry (Vaccinium species) are very efficient at harvesting calcium from their environment and have no "off switch", for calcium uptake. They can be damaged by excess calcium in their soils, water and fertilizer.

So look at your soil, water and fertilizer, figure out how much calcium you are getting. You might not want to be adding additional calcium in the fertilizer.

If you are collecting and using rain water to water your trees, you definitely do need to add calcium for most if not all your trees, even the azalea. So depending on your watering methods, this fertilizer is either really good or maybe not so good.

I know this is not a "YES" or a "NO", just giving you the things to think about when looking at this as a "maybe". For my Lake Michigan municipal water, I would go ahead and use this for all my trees except the azalea, and blueberries.
Thanks Leo.
 

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