Ginkgo biloba

AlainK

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I bought a seedling many years ago, left it in a plastic pot for years because I didn't know what to do with it.

It grew, and I finally decided to air-layer the top in 2008, and keep the base for bonsai:



I still haven't fully understood the requirements of this species, but when repotting it today, I noticed that the bottom layer of soil (3/3rd pozzolane, 1/3rd pumice) didn't show any roots:





So this time, I used a different soil mix: about 50% akadama, 20% zeolith, 20% pumice, 10% composted bark, and a spoonful of activated carbon.



I think Ginkgo prefers clay-based soil, what do you think?

:?:
 

onlyrey

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Why the carbon? I've seen it in orchid soil mix, but never thought much of till you mention it now.
 

AlainK

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Why the carbon? I've seen it in orchid soil mix, but never thought much of till you mention it now.
Activated charcoal is a natural fungicide.

It also helps the plants assimilate nutrients.

Although it's not exactly the same, you might find this worth reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_preta

Watch from 11'30" then at 39":

 

sorce

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Charcoal also has a high ass CEC rating.

I just looked at one of my trees the other day that had some pelleted charcoal in it.....I remember thinking.....

"Oh charcoal!, Damn, healthy!"

Sorce
 

Guy Vitale

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Just started hearing about activated charcoal in bonsai soils, would activated carbon found in aquarium shops work the same?
 

pweifan

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Activated charcoal is a natural fungicide.

It also helps the plants assimilate nutrients.

Although it's not exactly the same, you might find this worth reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_preta

Watch from 11'30" then at 39":

A good friend of mine on another forum is using Terra Preta as a bottom layer for his fishtank. I don't think he's convinced that everything came together as well as he'd like, but it's sure hard to argue with his results.
 

drew33998

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I believe the zeolite does much the same. I use that too.
 

DougB

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My friend at bonsaibardo.com has a good selection of charcoal as well as other tried and true bonsai items. Check him out.
 

AlainK

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Thanks for the kind words Geo. You might find this other one interesting, it's called:
视频: 银杏盆景制作技术
"Video: Ginkgo bonsai production technology"
It's amazing what this guy does. The period of the year also shows that the climate is different, the soil he uses is different, the tools he uses look very basic for most of us, and the styles of the trees are sometimes so far from our vision of a Ginkgo bonsai. I find it fascinating:

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTYxNDE5NzY4.html
 

pweifan

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I was surprised to see the almost clay-like soil, but using candle wax as a cut paste blew my mind. Thanks for sharing!
 

AlainK

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I was surprised to see the almost clay-like soil, but using candle wax as a cut paste blew my mind.
Yes, when you see how much water stays on the soil after watering, the concept of "free-draining mix" seems very relative ;)

These are grown in the southern part of China, from Shanghai to Guangzhou, in a subtropical climate.
 

AlainK

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What I really like about deciduous, including Ginkgo, Larch and a couple of other conifers - is the change of colours throughout the seasons.

For this one at least, the winter bare branches are far from being worth a praise, but I already enjoy the different shades between green and gold:

(24 Sept., 8 Oct., 15 Oct.)

ginkgo01_160924a.jpg ginkgo01_161008a.jpg ginkgo01_161015a.jpg
 

JoeR

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What I really like about deciduous, including Ginkgo, Larch and a couple of other conifers - is the change of colours throughout the seasons.

For this one at least, the winter bare branches are far from being worth a praise, but I already enjoy the different shades between green and gold:

(24 Sept., 8 Oct., 15 Oct.)

View attachment 120112 View attachment 120113 View attachment 120114
Did you notice an improvement with the akadama?

I have one I got on sale that will undergo severe work, such as a chop and repot from a 5 gallon container. Not sure what to pot it in, Its not happy in what its in now. Thinking akadama and pumice 50/50?
 

whfarro

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20160521_133427.jpg 20151013_103628.jpg
Yes, the spectacular color of ginkgo in the autumn what I love about them. Pics here from last fall and this past spring. Just starting to get a bit of golden color along the edges of the leaves this week.
 

GGB

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This thread is awesome, and to add to it.. I've noticed horticultural charcoal is lighter (less dense) that charcoal used in aquarium filters. Without doing any further research i'd guess that there is a reason for that.
 
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AlainK

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Did you notice an improvement with the akadama?
I did.

I still like "mixed mix" with a little pozzolane and some composted bark pine, but yes, a higher proportion of akadama seems to be beneficial.

I used almost no fertilizer, only once or twice in the spring (liquid chemical 6-6-6).
 

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