Glaucus Satsuki Azalea farm

Glaucus

Shohin
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Here some pictures of my satsuki production line.
Most of these are hybrid seedlings. Some are cuttings of named cultivar.

Seedlings in the test grow:
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These ones grow very well in full sun and quite organic-material poor sandy soil.
I expect solid purple flowers on these.


A whole bunch more with smaller leaves and more bushy plant habit:
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I have hundreds of these.

Additionaly, I have hundreds of potted seedlings:
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Why do I have so many? I am looking for a seedling with unusual or improved flowers that I can register as a new named cultivar.
The other ones with normal 'boring' flowers, I need to get rid off to make space for new seedlings.
I can already see that many of these azaleas are perfectly fine plants.
Easiest way for me to get rid of them is by composting them. However, I am also considering now to sell some of them.
These seedlings are not trained as bonsai. And neither have they been giving the pruning treatment to make a perfect spherical dense shrub for landscaping.
I don't prune them to be able to most quickly see their flowers and make a selection.

Additionally, I do have cuttings of named cultivars that I am growing into whips, to be trained as bonsai. I also can't keep all of these.
I hope to be able to offer some that really have additional value because of bonsai training in a few years.
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(Don't mind the slug-ravaged chili plants in the top left. Slugs seem to leave the satsuki completely alone.)

Furthermore, in a few years I hope to be able to offer rare new Japanese satsuki cultivars as well.

I guess I need to figure out if there is actual additional demand in the EU zone. Then possibly build my own webshop. Or find someone who already has one and wants to take a whole bunch off me and sell them. Possibly sell them locally is also an option. And if there is no demand, produce less new cuttings.

Additionally, this thread can be a place for some more azalea educational stuff. I am usually too busy to take pictures of 'mundane' tasks like repotting.
I can maybe share more of what I am doing, but not sure what level of interest there is. Usually, it is not bonsai-specific.
 
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that's awesome! I wish you a great success in your endeavors
 

Deep Sea Diver

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Well done Mark!

We are looking forward to future posts!

Cheers
DSD sends
 

Glaucus

Shohin
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Amphibious friends.

Not exactly sure why, but frogs seem to want to sit among my azalea pots, for some reason. Maybe because I water them and they were therefore a wet place in a very dry summer.
Sometimes, they crawl all the way in between the pots. Sometimes they sit partially on the azalea:
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Additionally, salamanders hide in great numbers underneath the trays and crates. Sometimes, under a single tray there may be 4 salamanders.
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If I were to lift all crates and trays right now and collect all salamanders, they may amount to up to 30 or 40. I believe they are all juveniles and I assume that during the night, they go crawl around and look for food.

Additionally, I also have a cutting that is flowering (because it was rooted last year and grew indoors):
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This is one of my own seedlings and has superior foliage, I would say. It turns out this cutting already has the white centers. The original plant took about 10 years before it showed the white centers. And now half the flowers have it.
I am strongly thinking about registering this one. Possible name, maybe 'Velvet Eye'.

I have also started to harvest this year's seeds and showed the first tray: 'Aika' x 'Hekisui'.
 
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Deep Sea Diver

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Funny you posted the frog photos. A couple weeks ago we noticed random frog calls in our backyard. Never had these before. Yesterday when we relocated the trays of whips, out poked the head of a friendly tree frog in one of the trays.

Really nice flowers Mark. I like the raspberry colored pistils. Well done!

cheers
DSD sends
 

Carol 83

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Amphibious friends.

Not exactly sure why, but frogs seem to want to sit among my azalea pots, for some reason. Maybe because I water them and they were therefore a wet place in a very dry summer.
Sometimes, they crawl all the way in between the pots. Sometimes they sit partially on the azalea:
View attachment 455065
View attachment 455066

Additionally, salamanders hide in great numbers underneath the trays and crates. Sometimes, under a single tray there may be 4 salamanders.
View attachment 455067
View attachment 455068

If I were to lift all crates and trays right now and collect all salamanders, they may amount to up to 30 or 40. I believe they are all juveniles and I assume that during the night, they go crawl around and look for food.

Additionally, I also have a cutting that is flowering (because it was rooted last year and grew indoors):
View attachment 455074

This is one of my own seedlings and has superior foliage, I would say. It turns out this cutting already has the white centers. The original plant took about 10 years before it showed the white centers. And now half the flowers have it.
I am strongly thinking about registering this one. Possible name, maybe 'Velvet Eye'.

I have also started to harvest this year's seeds and showed the first tray: 'Aika' x 'Hekisui'.
Beautiful flower.
 

Glaucus

Shohin
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So this summer had very little rain and a lot of sunlight hours. I think it was a record in terms of sun hours. And the drought was pretty bad. We are supposed to get about 50 to 60mm of rain each month. But I think July had 10mm and august 2mm. And even all the months before that there was already a 100mm deficit.
I transplanted seedlings from last year into a growing field, which has pretty humus-poor soil. The first I show here were planted before winter. Some others were transplanted there in the middle of summer, always during more overcast days.
They were watered about 1 to even 3 times a day.

There is almost no shade for the growing field. During the hottest days, I did provide some shade cloth temporarily, because it was really too hot and dry and these were fresh transplants.
Only a section has permanent shade because of sunflowers planted there. This resulted into a symptom I rarely see in potted azalea.
It is a form of chlorosis, where the leaves lose colour. I think the leaves go yellow when the flowers are white, orangy when the flowers are coloured.
My hypothesis is that this symptom comes from either 1) too much sun 2) chronic heat or drought stress.
You can see that some have it bad, some intermediate, and some very little or nothing.

Here some pictures:

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You see here that two plants side by side are very different in the severity of these symptoms:

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A different cross didn't show these symptoms for a long time, but at the end of the summer some started to show a slightly similar symptom. Likely, they don't go yellow because all of these have brightly coloured flowers. So the leaves grow orangy.

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Note that you don't really see the chlorosis veins indicative of nitrogen deficiency.

The same cross as this last picture, but the area shaded by the sunflowers:
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No symptoms there. Note the soil also strayed moist there for a longer period of time, because of the shade.

So this is a clear symptom one can get with too much sun exposure during summer. I am not sure though if this is about sun intensity, the temperature of the plant and soil, or a chronic effect of drought.
Acute drought looks very different.

Also not sure if the diffence observed is because of genetic differences, or if the more healthy plants just had stronger root systems.
 

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