Grafting to accelerate healing of a large scar…from Kathy Shaner workshop

Brian Van Fleet

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1. Identify and grow shoots for use (keep them attached to the tree, like a thread graft)

2. Mark the location with a marker where they’ll be placed across the scar:
Tri1.jpg

3. Carve a channel across the scar, and ensure a good fit can be made on both sides of the callous:
Tri2.jpg

4. Mark the scion wood (with a marker) at the locations where it will be in contact with the callous, then scrape the bark to expose the cambium:
Tri3.jpg

5. Expose the cambium of the callous and ensure the scion fits tightly, with cambiums lining up:
Tri4.jpg
 

Brian Van Fleet

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6. Set the scion into the channel, and secure it with raffia ties. She looped a length raffia around the proximal section scion, the pulled tight around the trunk, and tied it to the distal section, pinning them down with pieces of bamboo:
Tri5.jpg

7. Continuing with all 3 grafts:
Tri6.jpg

8. Wrap the grafts with Parafilm (or grafting tape):
Tri7.jpg

9: Allow to grow!
 

Bill S

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Interesting Brian, and if it weren't Kathy, I'd almost want to say it seems counter intuitive. Did she get into the whys and wherefores??
 

snobird

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I'll do this kind of graft to get buds in that area for a future branch right in the middle of the scar and I guess she also placed the grafts so she has three options in future . The tree will produce some buds on the edge of the callus but the direction and location will be wrong.
 

tom tynan

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I am guessing that the three grafts will reduce the wound opening and in time the scar will heal in three smaller locations. Plus now there are (6) locations along the wound edge where active growing will take place perhaps helping to close the wound edge. Nicely done. Thanks for posting this techinque....Tom.
 

Ang3lfir3

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don't forget that as the callouses start to meet you can keep opening the wounds and letting them callous again until they are close enough to merge as a single callous..allowing you to connect them in a large area (deciduous material doesn't have as much veining problems as many evergreens)..... this will give you live tissue to then in arch graft to as well as using any buds that may have extended from the grafts....

I always learn something awesome when Kathy gets in involved :p thanks Brian... and great job getting pictures!!!!
 

Randy

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Would there be any difference in trying to have those branches going vertically into the scar instead of horizontally?
 

Ang3lfir3

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Would there be any difference in trying to have those branches going vertically into the scar instead of horizontally?

probably not... however as the branches were obviously from a nearby larger branch this would simply be easier... now... if they were heading down from the top... yes that would slow them down.... actually the heading up might be the fastest way.... but would most likely require the use of separate plants which if not from cutting on the same plant aren't guaranteed to appear the same (possibly not even then)
 

Brian Van Fleet

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I am guessing that the three grafts will reduce the wound opening and in time the scar will heal in three smaller locations. Plus now there are (6) locations along the wound edge where active growing will take place perhaps helping to close the wound edge. Nicely done. Thanks for posting this techinque....Tom.

That is 100% correct; these grafts are not to create vegetative growth, they are to close the scars. Next year, maybe I'll have a chance to see the tree again and see how it's coming along. These photos were from a March '10 workshop.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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I always learn something awesome when Kathy gets in involved :p thanks Brian... and great job getting pictures!!!!

Thanks, the photos aren't great in quality, but the technique was so fascinating, I wanted to be sure to capture it without being overly obnoxious. Fortunately, the technique shows up, but just as interesting is just how TIDY and precise her work is; it's inspirational to watch.
 

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You won't like what you see. What you will have is a huge ring of bottle cap serrations, as the tissue grows fast at the intersections and not so fast between.

Further, by bridging across the wound and securing each side as a graft, you have cut off the providing side. You would do better by using six whips with each end free. That way it will heal balanced. The providing side will not do much at all while the exiting side will build tissue faster, as in any approach graft. Remember the graft will only enlarge on the exiting side as this is the side that is free growing. The other side is just along for the ride. Also keep in mind that while you mentioned these grafts are not for vegative growth, they are! No vegative growth, no healing scars.

Been there , done that.

I will eagerly await your pictures next year.
 
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Brian Van Fleet

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Not my tree, not my work. Just sharing what Kathy did for someone who asked the question.

I was curious about the resulting scars too, maybe I'll get a chance to see the tree again sometime...
 

Smoke

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Not my tree, not my work. Just sharing what Kathy did for someone who asked the question.

I was curious about the resulting scars too, maybe I'll get a chance to see the tree again sometime...

Damn it, I was hoping we would get to see what goes on with this tree. I have used methods similer to this and have seen hideous results. Others peoples trees also. This was not the tree of some person in a club near you?
 

my nellie

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This thread appeared in the random photos shown on the upper right corner of the screen today.
... ...Next year, maybe I'll have a chance to see the tree again and see how it's coming along. These photos were from a March '10 workshop.
Did you ever happen to see this tree again since 2011?
And if positive, what is your opinion on the technique applied?
Thank you.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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This thread appeared in the random photos shown on the upper right corner of the screen today.Did you ever happen to see this tree again since 2011?
And if positive, what is your opinion on the technique applied?
Thank you.
Nope, haven’t seen it since the workshop.
 

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