Great deal.

FOX7591

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Hey there, at a local bonsai nursery i went out into his fields and found this, its 2 big larches, not sure what kind.. they were in a seedling tray for many many years and have had maples planted into the same tray, about 7 or 8 of them. so all together there was 7 or 8 shohin and mame maples and 2 big old larches all for only $25

Also i just repotted my 30 yr old tskumo cypress( not sure of the spelling again)..






another question... what does charcoal do as a part of a bonsai mix?
 

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FOX7591

Yamadori
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more pics...

now here are the larch's and the maples i was tlaking aobut...


so inside the grow box there are 2 big unidentified larches i guess ill know in the fall... and then the little one is a siberian larch
i have about 4 little japanese larches also, should i add them in next repot and make a big forest? or should i just have the two larches as a twin trunk and take out that siberian larch???


but what i think im going to do for now is just let the larches grow wild in the box and wait until after i move because where im moving the weather is harsh but larches grow naturally in the area,
 

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Charcoal=Carbon=Potash, the third component in fertilizer. Charcoal also has the ability to absorb impurities that are present in the soil. It is also said to "sweeten" the soil, though I've never tasted it to see if that's true:eek:
 

emk

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In the realm of "it's on the internet, so it must be true":

http://www.paghat.com/charcoal.html

This article suggests that most of the "amazing qualities" of horticultural charcoal (including absorbing impurities & removing odors) are scientifically unfounded and based on false advertising to sell a cheaply-made product at inflated prices. The author also asserts that if the wood is burned enough to be a good source of potash, it no longer serves as a good retainer of water & air...and vice versa.

Note that I have no horticultural background on which to confirm or deny any of this; I'm just posting what I've seen in the hopes of being helpful.

Nice looking larches BTW...can I have one? ;)
 
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In the realm of "it's on the internet, so it must be true":

http://www.paghat.com/charcoal.html

This article suggests that most of the "amazing qualities" of horticultural charcoal (including absorbing impurities & removing odors) are scientifically unfounded and based on false advertising to sell a cheaply-made product at inflated prices. The author also asserts that if the wood is burned enough to be a good source of potash, it no longer serves as a good retainer of water & air...and vice versa.

Note that I have no horticultural background on which to confirm or deny any of this; I'm just posting what I've seen in the hopes of being helpful.

Nice looking larches BTW...can I have one? ;)
Thanks so much for quoting "Paghat the Ratgirl."
 

elroy

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Charcoal is mostly C, carbon. Potash is K, potassium. Very little K in charcoal and unavailable at that.

Elroy

Charcoal=Carbon=Potash, the third component in fertilizer. Charcoal also has the ability to absorb impurities that are present in the soil. It is also said to "sweeten" the soil, though I've never tasted it to see if that's true:eek:
 

Bonsai Nut

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From my days as a marine aquarist, there is a big difference between charcoal and activated carbon. Activated carbon CAN do a great job within a water filter to remove dissolved organic compounds, as well as chlorines, chloramines, and chlorine-resistant cysts of bacteria like giardia and cryptosporidium. I doubt whether any of these functions would work with activated carbon as part of a soil mix, since the water has to flow through the carbon to gain the filtering benefit. Additionallly, carbon is considered a mechanical filter - i.e. it strains contaminants from the water but does not otherwise break them down. Given time the carbon can become saturated, or even break down and re-release the contaminants into the surrounding media. Carbon is always used separately in a filter so it can be replaced regularly when its efficiency is diminished (thus removing the contaminants).
 

bonsaibill

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Nice Larches
I'm going to a workshop the end of this month on Larches so I hope to learn alot.

Bonsaibill
 

Vance Wood

Lord Mugo
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Hey there, at a local bonsai nursery i went out into his fields and found this, its 2 big larches, not sure what kind.. they were in a seedling tray for many many years and have had maples planted into the same tray, about 7 or 8 of them. so all together there was 7 or 8 shohin and mame maples and 2 big old larches all for only $25

Also i just repotted my 30 yr old tskumo cypress( not sure of the spelling again)..?
I am not personally familiar with this tree hands on, or even from books so I am just speaking to you from experience and what I think you need to do with my experiences with a similar tree. If this is possible is really the core to the entire issue anyway.

If the tree were mine I would start trying to open up the foliage masses and spread out the secondary branching so that, in the words of J. Naka, the birds can fly through. After kooking at the photos I suspect that this is a false Cypress, Chamaecypress species and not a Cupressa or true Cypress. As such, and the photos seem to bear this out, they probably do not back bud well on older wood so it becomes important that you keep it open and well pinched or you run the real risk of having the growth extend beyond a point where you would like it to be at the cost of the growth in nearer the trunk where it should be. I would treat it like a Hinoki Cypress until someone can tell you different.








another question... what does charcoal do as a part of a bonsai mix
 

FOX7591

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I am not personally familiar with this tree hands on, or even from books so I am just speaking to you from experience and what I think you need to do with my experiences with a similar tree. If this is possible is really the core to the entire issue anyway.

If the tree were mine I would start trying to open up the foliage masses and spread out the secondary branching so that, in the words of J. Naka, the birds can fly through. After kooking at the photos I suspect that this is a false Cypress, Chamaecypress species and not a Cupressa or true Cypress. As such, and the photos seem to bear this out, they probably do not back bud well on older wood so it becomes important that you keep it open and well pinched or you run the real risk of having the growth extend beyond a point where you would like it to be at the cost of the growth in nearer the trunk where it should be. I would treat it like a Hinoki Cypress until someone can tell you different.

Thanks Vance

Yes ive been treating it like a hinoki cypress because the hinoki cypress is similar to it i think.
and yes i have been slowly working on those larches when i get them styled i can get another pic up if anyone wants.
 
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