GroBetter Fertilizer

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#21
Did you try this Woodace ?https://www.lebanonturf.com/products/items/2256323/index.aspx
I have been using it combined with organic fertilizer for few years with good result. My California junipers have been growing like the weeds !
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I use Woodace and Miracid this year but not much improvement. I haven't tried to combine Woodace and Growbetter chicken manure. Seem like you use alot of Woodace for your trees.
 

bonhe

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#22
I use Woodace and Miracid this year but not much improvement. I haven't tried to combine Woodace and Growbetter chicken manure. Seem like you use alot of Woodace for your trees.
Yes I do. I always combine chemical and organic fertilizers. If one just use chemical fertilizer alone, that regimen will not be balanced. The rootage needs microorganisms to help absorbing the nutrients. Besides, I also use humic acid granules quite a bit .
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Bonsai Nut

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#23
For some reason, my tap water pH has been 7 for a while now . May be my water district changed the water source?!
You are very lucky. We use Moulton Niguel Water. I just checked their site, and the most recent water quality report is for 2017 (the entire year). Measured pH ranged from 8.2 to 8.6, with an average of 8.4(!) So their own supply measurements were reading even more alkaline than my measurements out of the tap!
 

bonhe

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#24
You are very lucky. We use Moulton Niguel Water. I just checked their site, and the most recent water quality report is for 2017 (the entire year). Measured pH ranged from 8.2 to 8.6, with an average of 8.4(!) So their own supply measurements were reading even more alkaline than my measurements out of the tap!
Yes, I am. I think I can grow satsuki now 😊
The water source is very important not only for plants, but also for human’s health. You may be really surprised to know there is one person living right in the heart of Riverside City has a lot of satsuki Bonsai! I have to say he has more than 100 satsuki with many different kinds! Unbelievable! I consider him as a king of satsuki in the Southern Cal. The main points are the water source and humidity!
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#25
Yes I do. I always combine chemical and organic fertilizers. If one just use chemical fertilizer alone, that regimen will not be balanced. The rootage needs microorganisms to help absorbing the nutrients. Besides, I also use humic acid granules quite a bit .
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Do you use Down to Earch Granular Humic Acids or something else? Thanks
 

bonhe

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#26
Do you use Down to Earch Granular Humic Acids or something else? Thanks
I have been using Grow More humid acid granular 50 lbs bag .
4DEBA1B8-1041-4DF8-98B4-E9BBA1AA0572.jpeg
I think you can use other manufacturers. Humid acid is a great stuff to use because it works on all development of the tree. One of my friends just gave me FPF fermentation extract with 1% humic acid. I will use it as foliage spray on new collected California junipers. It should stimulate the root growth .
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#27
I have been using Grow More humid acid granular 50 lbs bag .
View attachment 220545
I think you can use other manufacturers. Humid acid is a great stuff to use because it works on all development of the tree. One of my friends just gave me FPF fermentation extract with 1% humic acid. I will use it as foliage spray on new collected California junipers. It should stimulate the root growth .
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Thanks so lot for your helpful info Thu Thoai.
 
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#29
. If one just use chemical fertilizer alone, that regimen will not be balanced.
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I'm afraid this is not true. Hundreds of millions of plants are raised each year using only synthetic fertilizers. Micro organisms are always present around the roots. Always. They feed on the exudates from the roots and help protect them at the same time.
However, I also use a combination of organic and synthetic not for the microbes but for a better or more complete range of nutrients and to lower the N of the manufactured stuff.
 
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#30
You are very lucky. We use Moulton Niguel Water. I just checked their site, and the most recent water quality report is for 2017 (the entire year). Measured pH ranged from 8.2 to 8.6, with an average of 8.4(!) So their own supply measurements were reading even more alkaline than my measurements out of the tap!
Chickens are usually fed shell grit to help with grinding the food. That's why their manure is often alkaline. Particularly commercial preps.
 

bonhe

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#31
I'm afraid this is not true. Hundreds of millions of plants are raised each year using only synthetic fertilizers. Micro organisms are always present around the roots. Always. They feed on the exudates from the roots and help protect them at the same time.
However, I also use a combination of organic and synthetic not for the microbes but for a better or more complete range of nutrients and to lower the N of the manufactured stuff.
Thank you for info. Yes, no doubt about the fact of microorganisms living around the roots. The microorganisms present every where on the earth. You can even find multiple microorganisms on the metal or any inert surface ! But the amount of microorganisms which you are talking about is not enough to produce the healthy micro system for absorption of nutrients. It is why organic fertilizer needed to help building up beneficial microorganisms in the soil. Besides, organic fertilizers will supply humate which benefit the plants more.
You may know yin and yang theory in Chinese philosophy. In the universe, yin and yang always stay together even though they are contrast to each other. In yin has yang and vice versa. I consider organic fertilizer is yin and chemical fertilizer is yang.
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bonhe

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#32
Chickens are usually fed shell grit to help with grinding the food. That's why their manure is often alkaline. Particularly commercial preps.
How is about the short time transit in the intestines create this alkaline pH?
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#33
But the amount of microorganisms which you are talking about is not enough to produce the healthy micro system for absorption of nutrients. It is why organic fertilizer needed to help building up beneficial microorganisms in the soil.
Not correct I'm afraid bonhe. If for example you give Urea, there will be bacteria which break that down to ammonium. Their numbers will increase in direct proportion to the level of Urea applied. In other words, the microbes are always present and their numbers increase when food for them increases. Adding organic fertilizers will certainly increase decomposing microbes, but the amount of nutrients the plant receives has everything to do with the amount of nutrients applied whether that is from organic or manufactured fertilizer. I think you may be confusing the role of ''beneficial'' microbes. Their high populations are of benefit to plants by being antagonistic to pathogenic microbes (more than their ability to break down nutrients) and for that they are important of course. Consider hydroponics. Organics are almost never used however the plants are very productive. Their root systems team with microbes which no doubt protect them but all the nutrients arrive and are taken up in mineral form. If you believe - as I do - that organics are important because they supply some rare nutrients and more balanced nutrient ratios, then that is another subject.
 

bonhe

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#35
Not correct I'm afraid bonhe. If for example you give Urea, there will be bacteria which break that down to ammonium. Their numbers will increase in direct proportion to the level of Urea applied. In other words, the microbes are always present and their numbers increase when food for them increases. Adding organic fertilizers will certainly increase decomposing microbes, but the amount of nutrients the plant receives has everything to do with the amount of nutrients applied whether that is from organic or manufactured fertilizer. I think you may be confusing the role of ''beneficial'' microbes. Their high populations are of benefit to plants by being antagonistic to pathogenic microbes (more than their ability to break down nutrients) and for that they are important of course. Consider hydroponics. Organics are almost never used however the plants are very productive. Their root systems team with microbes which no doubt protect them but all the nutrients arrive and are taken up in mineral form. If you believe - as I do - that organics are important because they supply some rare nutrients and more balanced nutrient ratios, then that is another subject.
Haha, now I understand why the people says there will be a "war"" when the fertilizer topic are discussed ! I don't think we can apply hydroponic use on the tree grown in the soil because their root environment and care are completely different! By the way, I am not confused about beneficial microbes role :)

Well the shell grit is calcium carbonate and what goes in must come out! :)
The reason I wrote so is that the large intestine of the chicken is really short! Did you notice that the chicken always has a loose bowel movement, almost diarrhea ? It is why chicken's stool has alkaline pH !
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bonhe

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#36
I recently collected a bag of mountain goat poops
7DA1C58A-3660-43A2-A6EC-B43673E5C6EE.jpeg

It was used to feed my black pine and California junipers
B9A2C6C1-E464-4021-A898-5E1BBA11AC65.jpeg

I believe it will be very good for the trees!
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#37
Yes I do. I always combine chemical and organic fertilizers. If one just use chemical fertilizer alone, that regimen will not be balanced. The rootage needs microorganisms to help absorbing the nutrients. Besides, I also use humic acid granules quite a bit .
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Hi Bonhe,

Do you have tree fungus problem with Jong's chicken manure like Si Nguyen had? Thanks
 

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