Ground layering Ulmus

jquast

Shohin
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I recently purchased an Ulmus that has good structure in regards to the trunk and branch placement however the roots are very poor. I need to repot the tree since it is in heavy sand I was wondering if I should start the ground layer now with the repot or wait until the growing season.

Thanks,
jeff
 

rockm

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If you're in an area that still has freezing weather ahead, beginning air layering now might damage or kill your tree. Dormant trees don't produce roots.
 

jquast

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I'm out in California so things are starting to wake up. My thinking was to wait until later in the year for cutting into the cambium but was wondering if anyone else had any advice.

jeff
 

Smoke

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Bay area? Go for it. I seen elms at Boons with new leaves already. If you are at the coast as I suspect then it would be good now. I would do it during the repot, and shelter it with these storms we are having. Maybe even a tent to protect from rain and cold for a few weeks. If your getting swollen buds or even signs of green in the buds and you wait you will miss it and have to wait untill mid summer and defoliate and layer then.

I am in the central valley and have noticed the buds here are starting to get round and swollen. About two more weeks or less if we get some sun after this week long storm. Prior to the storm I had a few days over 60 degrees which is the key temp for moving sap and waking up.
 

jquast

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Thanks for the advice Al. I've got a few elms and hawthorns that have started to open and most of my maples that started to swell. Looking forward to spring finally arriving.
 

grouper52

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Most trees show root growth only when soil temperatures are at 45F and above. A heating pad can help, but is probably not necessary this time of year where you live.
 
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