Growing rates for different species

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Which are the growing rates per year for different species? I am trying to structure the information and to decide which trees to start with.

I understand that Japanese Red Maples and Japanese Pines are very slow growers.

Which are the fastest growers? Let's consider ground growing / colander.

Thanks.
 

JosephCooper

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Let's see, fast growers...

Willows, Ficus, Oaks, Crape Myrtle, Crabapple, Bloodgood maple, Gingko, weeping Jap. maple, and Elms

I don't know where you got your info, but Red maples are pretty fast growing.
 
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I have asked a local lady from a nursery about the japanese red maple and also on internet people say that it is a slowly growing.

Chinese elms from seed are growing slowly comparing with Tamarind for exemple. In 2 months Tamarinds seedlings were 2 times bigger than the Chinese Elms seedling.
 

GrimLore

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If you are buying bare roots whips and Spring planting Chinese Elms, as well as other Elms, and most pitted Fruits except Apricot. Bald Cypress in these parts, Quince, Azalea, and Cotoneaster are also fast growers here too.

Grimmy
 

Stan Kengai

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The two most vigorous plants I own are trident maples and Chinese quince. I think there is a difference between fast growth and vigor. Some plants will put out long extensions in the spring and then not grow much after that. The trident and Ch. Quince grow strongly all season long, including after being pruned, which can slow other plants down.
 

Solaris

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The real answer to this question is, as @sorce would say, "It depends."
In Texas, some of my plants did great and most did poorly. Here in Michigan, most are doing much better - but some that liked Texas are pretty sulky and slow to grow. Thus, you'll find different people in different regions will give you different answers. I would very much trust the experience of your local nurserymen over people halfway around the world for the growth rates of trees in your area.

Let's see, fast growers...

Willows, Ficus, Oaks, Crape Myrtle, Crabapple, Bloodgood maple, Gingko, weeping Jap. maple, and Elms

I don't know where you got your info, but Red maples are pretty fast growing.

Acer rubrum grows like a weed. Acer palmatum with red leaves (the red Japanese maple) doesn't. I have a couple that grow decently quickly, and others that grow fairly slowly, but none on par with a really fast-growing tree.
 

sorce

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, "It depends

I got that fron Adair....I think he got it from John Kirby or it's a Boon Camp saying?

I wonder where from before?

Anyway....

"Support your Local Boon Camp Agent"

Sorce
 

GGB

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I think "it depends" might be the real answer to every horticultural question.

Species will play a huge part too. I have english oaks and they are slow as turtles in terms of growth, I'm sure quercus alba is probably way faster.

JBP is pretty fast when happy, I LOVE growing trees from seed but have learned it can/should (for me) only be done with the fastest growing species .....
in my experience (Eastern PA) the winners (that i PERSONALLY have experience with) are..
Bald cypress
Loblolly Pine
American Elm
Freemans/silver/red maple
Siberian elm
Dawn redwood
white mulberry

And even in that list, it's all relative. Loblolly pine grow wayyyyyyyyyyyyy faster than scots or JWP. But Probably couldn't keep pace with a dawn redwood, maybe that's just in my garden though.
 

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