Growing under fluorescent lights

Flabonsai

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Hello I'm very Thankful I found this great forum.

I'm growing my indoor bonsais under 2 T8 shop lights from the big box store. That's a total of 4 tubes by 4ft. I bought the Philips Daylight deluxe and the specs per tube are 2800 lumens and 6500k. My question is should I also Buy the soft white tubes around 3000k and mix. Lets say I install a 6500k and a 3000k tube in one fixture together or should I Just keep all 4 tubes at 6500k. My trees are a willow leaf ficus a Fukien Tea and a Serissa. Thanks for advice in advance.
 

jk_lewis

Masterpiece
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No need to make things too complex. You have ample light.
 

Flabonsai

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No need to make things too complex. You have ample light.
Ok thank you for the response, The trees will be staying indoors though out the year and they also get some sun light from my south window.
 
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I see you are in south Florida. I would think those trees could spend the warmest part of the year outside. You will see them become far more robust and healthy as a result of fresh air, full sun and rainfall. You just need to be careful acclimating them the first few days. Try it for a growing season to see if you notice a difference:D
 

Flabonsai

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I see you are in south Florida. I would think those trees could spend the warmest part of the year outside. You will see them become far more robust and healthy as a result of fresh air, full sun and rainfall. You just need to be careful acclimating them the first few days. Try it for a growing season to see if you notice a difference:D
I live in an apartment complex, so I have no other choice but for them to live indoors right now.
 

Flabonsai

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Read this and see if it helps answer your question. It is a very good article from someone written by someone with experience doing what you ask:

How I've Been Growing Bonsai Indoors Under Cool White Fluorescent Light - Jack Wikle
http://www.annarborbonsaisociety.org/documents/FluLgtBonsaiWithPic.pdf
Thank you that's a really good article, The t8 fluorescent tubes even use less electricity and even put out a few more lumens and you can have trees almost touching the bulbs. If the t5's ever come down in price I'll go for that setup.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Every now and then the question of artificial lighting comes up. In a nutshell, it depends greatly upon the type and number of trees. While standard flourescents may be adequate for some low light tropicals, it is quite possible to grow even the most light requiring trees (like black pines) under artificial light.

Two quick suggestions to help you start your research:

(1) Plants need light for photosynthesis, and the spectral intensities are very different from the full spectrum lighting that comes from the sun. This is why "grow lights" for commercial growing operations appear very different to the human eye than sunlight. All artificial lighting generates a quantity of "PAR" - which stands for Photosynthetically Available Radiation. The higher the PAR, the more light requiring plants you can keep.

(2) Do not go to Home Depot (or other general merchandise store) for your lights or lighting information, without first spending some time with the groups of people that have a LOT of experience with Artificial Lighting for Photosynthesis. This includes people who keep salt water reef aquariums and people who are into hydroponics and marijuana cultivation (here in California). I don't want to get stuck on the question of marijuana legality, but these people know a LOT about lighting setups.

Bottom line, there are a ton of options available - many of which you probably have never seen or heard of. For example, they are now keeping tropic reef corals under high intensity LED panels which give off almost no heat, last for years without needing bulb replacement, and cost a ton :)

Do some Google searchs and check out places like Reef Central (where they have a forum dedicated to lighting). I'm sure there are other great "grower" sites.

 

Flabonsai

Yamadori
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Every now and then the question of artificial lighting comes up. In a nutshell, it depends greatly upon the type and number of trees. While standard flourescents may be adequate for some low light tropicals, it is quite possible to grow even the most light requiring trees (like black pines) under artificial light.

Two quick suggestions to help you start your research:

(1) Plants need light for photosynthesis, and the spectral intensities are very different from the full spectrum lighting that comes from the sun. This is why "grow lights" for commercial growing operations appear very different to the human eye than sunlight. All artificial lighting generates a quantity of "PAR" - which stands for Photosynthetically Available Radiation. The higher the PAR, the more light requiring plants you can keep.

(2) Do not go to Home Depot (or other general merchandise store) for your lights or lighting information, without first spending some time with the groups of people that have a LOT of experience with Artificial Lighting for Photosynthesis. This includes people who keep salt water reef aquariums and people who are into hydroponics and marijuana cultivation (here in California). I don't want to get stuck on the question of marijuana legality, but these people know a LOT about lighting setups.

Bottom line, there are a ton of options available - many of which you probably have never seen or heard of. For example, they are now keeping tropic reef corals under high intensity LED panels which give off almost no heat, last for years without needing bulb replacement, and cost a ton :)

Do some Google searchs and check out places like Reef Central (where they have a forum dedicated to lighting). I'm sure there are other great "grower" sites.

Thanks Bonsai Nut for the very useful information. I have been doing a little research and my light requirements for my ficus and Fukien Tea's should be just enough. I'm getting about 1000 lux from my light meter. The trees also get about 2 hours a day of direct sun light from my south window. The sun is heading north so they probably only have about 1 more month before the overhang of my roof starts to block the direct sun light.
 

Dr.GreenThumb

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Hello guys,

I am living in Norway and winter here are long and cold.Therefore I have made some research about artificial lights in order to make an indoor garden for my (tropical) bonsaï (oléa, ficus..).

I have been reading many forums and articles about it; Apparently the best choice regarding the light quality, power, heat and costs saving are the CFL lamps (6500K):
- 100% of the spectrum is used.
- 250watts lamps create more than 135000 lumens (at 3cm with a reflector).
- Almost no heat.
- Long life and low costs (90 euros the lamp).

I baught 2 CFL 6500k, 250Watts in december and my trees are growing insanely.
(On the right a normal lamp)


These lamps are also very good for pruning and reproducting.
I believe it his also the best for my next yamadoris if I use them in my basement (fresh air, no heat, no wind, and a lot of light) I'll try it this spring.

Ciao !
 
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