Guidance for Kotohime

JoeR

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I’d estimate about 50% of the hardwood cuttings from February are alive. So of course I had to do more!

Looking at pictures I’d say that the larger cuttings did best.
 

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JoeR

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I’ve now realized, all too late, my pattern of failure with this species. Initially they grow vigorously for a season or two with no problems. They are then ready for a cutback, and following this they never fully recover, slowly weakening and dying from /anthracrose/. A healthy maple should have no problem recovering from cutbacks like that. Really a shame, this tree had come a long way already and had some real potential. Now the question remains, how can I prevent this same outcome from occurring in the future?
 

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I’ve now realized, all too late, my pattern of failure with this species. Initially they grow vigorously for a season or two with no problems. They are then ready for a cutback, and following this they never fully recover, slowly weakening and dying from /anthracrose/. A healthy maple should have no problem recovering from cutbacks like that. Really a shame, this tree had come a long way already and had some real potential. Now the question remains, how can I prevent this same outcome from occurring in the future?
Sorry Joe.

Im working on a few Kotohime cuttings myself. Last year they really weren't very happy, kinda like you said a second or third year downfall. I also left mine off the ground last winter (I usually put most maple on ground during winter) So I don't know if that was causing the slower growth.
I was enjoying the nice weather last weekend and cut all of them back really hard. So I will see if that reinvigorates or comminutes them downhill. I didn't do any major chopping just cutting all major trunk/branches back closer to the inner base.
 
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from what i understand, the density of the kotohime leaves increases dampness/humidity, and decreases air flow = increase chance of issues/disease.

1 - my kotohime are as dense as the one you posted above (attached here, for clarity's sake). The internodes are unnecessarily short, so i removed a leaf from most leaf-pairs, alternating sides. some people do this to allow light to to the interior of the tree, or to limit branch thickening - i did it to play it safe with my kotohime in terms of disease, since they are all too close to my precious deshojos on the bench!

2 - a few members have gone out of their to explain the importance of spraying trees at bud swell, and have documented the process very clearly. the link below is a good place to start. you can also use the search function and try words like 'fungus' and 'sulphur' etc and add by @markyscott to your search criteria. Get out your notebook and make 3-4 hours of space in your schedule :)

https://www.facebook.com/notes/hous...ose-on-the-texas-gulf-coast/1384161804947772/

2 paragraphs deserve special mention:

"The fungus overwinters on buds, bark, twigs, fruit, fallen leaves or petioles depending on which hosts and pathogens are involved. It attacks leaves in spring when the cool wet conditions are optimal for its growth. The disease cycle begins when spores are dispersed short distances by water or spread long distances by air to newly forming shoots. The fungus becomes active about the same time that the tree does."

"Preventative chemical sprays should be applied just before bud break every spring. I use a diluted lime sulfur solution (5 oz per gallon) on all deciduous trees just before bud break every year."

if i was a fungus, i'd be hide-and-go-seek champion of the world if my playground were the bud-dense branches of kotohime, and boy does the volume of those buds over such a short area ever provide the opportunity for penetration too!
 

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JoeR

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from what i understand, the density of the kotohime leaves increases dampness/humidity, and decreases air flow = increase chance of issues/disease.

1 - my kotohime are as dense as the one you posted above (attached here, for clarity's sake). The internodes are unnecessarily short, so i removed a leaf from most leaf-pairs, alternating sides. some people do this to allow light to to the interior of the tree, or to limit branch thickening - i did it to play it safe with my kotohime in terms of disease, since they are all too close to my precious deshojos on the bench!

2 - a few members have gone out of their to explain the importance of spraying trees at bud swell, and have documented the process very clearly. the link below is a good place to start. you can also use the search function and try words like 'fungus' and 'sulphur' etc and add by @markyscott to your search criteria. Get out your notebook and make 3-4 hours of space in your schedule :)

https://www.facebook.com/notes/hous...ose-on-the-texas-gulf-coast/1384161804947772/

2 paragraphs deserve special mention:

"The fungus overwinters on buds, bark, twigs, fruit, fallen leaves or petioles depending on which hosts and pathogens are involved. It attacks leaves in spring when the cool wet conditions are optimal for its growth. The disease cycle begins when spores are dispersed short distances by water or spread long distances by air to newly forming shoots. The fungus becomes active about the same time that the tree does."

"Preventative chemical sprays should be applied just before bud break every spring. I use a diluted lime sulfur solution (5 oz per gallon) on all deciduous trees just before bud break every year."

if i was a fungus, i'd be hide-and-go-seek champion of the world if my playground were the bud-dense branches of kotohime, and boy does the volume of those buds over such a short area ever provide the opportunity for penetration too!
I have certainly found this year an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure with these issues. Previously I had foregone all the preemptive preventative treatments, thinking they were unnecessary, however it’s quite clear to me now that it is a necessary evil. I have read countless articles, especially the ones by MarkyScott, and I’m now trying to form a set plan. I’ve already power washed all my benches, removed all the leaves I could especially any maple leaves from the pots, benches, and gravel around the benches, and as soon as my bulk Lime Sulfur arrives I’ll be spraying that. Following that two weeks later I have a horticultural oil spray I’ll use.

Do you keep your koto in full sun?
 
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If you are overwintering your trees outdoors, you are lucky. Mine are indoors for winter. I am still trying to figure out the best situation for applying lime-sulphur to my trees before bud break, since they will be indoor at that time, and outdoors it will likely still be below 0C (32F) at that time. I might have to wait for a warm day, bring them out, spray them, and bring them back in before nightfall. FML.

Do you keep your koto in full sun?
Im in Montreal, and have a south-facing yard. All of my maples get direct sun from sunrise until about noon. After which they are in the shade. This is not ideal, but it works. I mention that I am in Montreal because I used to live in North Carolina, and I can say with confidence that my direct sun now is not like your direct sun.

Comparative information may be more helpful for you. In my experience, deshojo and kotohime are more sensitive to sun, in comparison to my kashima and arakawa. but I don't know if these are general rules, or particular to my situation and specimens.
 

JoeR

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If you are overwintering your trees outdoors, you are lucky. Mine are indoors for winter. I am still trying to figure out the best situation for applying lime-sulphur to my trees before bud break, since they will be indoor at that time, and outdoors it will likely still be below 0C (32F) at that time. I might have to wait for a warm day, bring them out, spray them, and bring them back in before nightfall. FML.



Im in Montreal, and have a south-facing yard. All of my maples get direct sun from sunrise until about noon. After which they are in the shade. This is not ideal, but it works. I mention that I am in Montreal because I used to live in North Carolina, and I can say with confidence that my direct sun now is not like your direct sun.

Comparative information may be more helpful for you. In my experience, deshojo and kotohime are more sensitive to sun, in comparison to my kashima and arakawa. but I don't know if these are general rules, or particular to my situation and specimens.
Yep they’re all outside, currently on a raised platform under this bench with a tarp over it on the colder nights, only 2 times so far.

I would say generally the cork bark JM are more tolerant, I have an “Ibo Nishiki” cork JM and it is certainly more hardy than the koto was. Although, I had left the koto in full spring sun before with no problems. They can handle more sun then I often expect given they’re well watered.
 

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JoeR

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The Ibo Nishiki is the large one in the grow box on the left, it’s actually on the bench still because it’s roots went wild and grew into the treated boards underneath. These benches are on their last legs anyway, need to make new ones this year
 
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nice bench!

it makes sense that coral barks would be more tolerant to the sun -- i was told by vineland nurseries that they are not at all tolerant to the cold!! Even where katsura and desjoho survive the winter, sango kaku might not

they are trees that love the sun and warm weather :cool:
 

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