Guidance in collecting some native species.

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Hello everyone, new to this forum (been on BonsaiSite forums for awhile now). I live in Coastal Southeastern NC zone 8.

I'm also new to collecting and was hoping to get some advice and help from you guys. I've already read a lot on the subject but was hoping I could get some specific help on certain species. If anyone has experience with any of the trees I list, your help would be greatly appreciated.

The first I am certain is a wax myrtle (Myrica cerifera). These grow everywhere like weeds! Me and a buddy went over to his families property this week and found many of these that had been cut back in the past and look like perfect candidates for collecting. Does anyone have experience with this species? My research shows that it should work well for bonsai. Collecting tips?



Next is what I believe to be a type of Yaupon holly(Ilex vomitoria). Correct me if I'm wrong. We found these to be growing everywhere as well, from small seedlings to small trees like the one below. Tips for collecting this species?




EDIT: I now know this is an an eastern red "cedar". Thanks
And finally a type of cedar. Still not positive on what type, possibly an Atlantic White cedar? They are found in abundance around wet areas, near the water in this area. Thoughts on possible use as bonsai?

Just for reference, the trunk/bark. Probably wouldn't collect this one but there are many other good, smaller candidates.

An image of one growing near my house. The large old ones can get very impressive! With massive trunks and most of the growth centered near the top of the tree when growing in crowded areas. Reminds me of all the old bald cypress growing in the area.


Any help with these trees would be awesome!
 
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rockm

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The "cedar" is "red cedar" which is actually a juniper (juniperus virginiana). Doesn't make very good bonsai. Too foliage is too lanky. Other species, like yaupon holly, are much much better subjects. Don't know about the wax myrtle, though.
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Thanks I also thought it might be that. But I started reading many things online that lead me to believe it was a cedar.
 
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jk_lewis

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It is Juniperus virginiana. I've seen some very nice red cedar bonsai. Have a cople of them in pots myself.

I. vomitoria is good for bonsai, but don't collet one with a trunk like that. Get as much root as you can.

I've nver successfully dug a wax myrtle, and know of no on who has.
 

rockm

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Looks to me like ERC, which is an extremely common plant on the East Coast all the way to the mid-west.

Atlantice White Cedar isn't as common and the foliage is flattened, more so than the cordlinke foliage that appears here. The bark on this also looks like ERC
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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It is Juniperus virginiana. I've seen some very nice red cedar bonsai. Have a cople of them in pots myself.

I. vomitoria is good for bonsai, but don't collet one with a trunk like that. Get as much root as you can.

I've nver successfully dug a wax myrtle, and know of no on who has.
Thanks I originaly had thought this was a type of juniper when I saw it in the wild but further reserch on the internet just confused me, haha. When have you collect these trees? Any special needs for the roots?

I had no intentions in collecting this particular tree, just snapped a picture for classification purpose. Their were many more better specimens near by. Best to collect late winter/early spring?

When you say you have never successfully dug one does that mean they haven't survived any attempt?

Thanks for the help guys.
 

rockm

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"Nice" is a relative term, I guess:D. I have seen some ERC bonsai that are indeed terrific, but they were managed quite carefully with specific foliage pinching techniques that kept their foliage tight. For the most part, their foliage and "vanilla" trunks are their main issues. Many people who have collected them graft on shimpaku juniperfoliage and replace the natural foliage.

In my experience, the natural cordlike foliage reverts to almost completely juvenile form--which is spiky loose and ugly--when these are collected and placed in pots.

Interesting trunks worthy of collection are not all that common, despite the billions of ERC out there. ERC trunks tend to be bolt upright with little of no taper in the first eight feet, with upright branches that confound training. If you locate a decent aged, characterful trunk (like a tree that's been smashed or pruned repeatedly in a field by mowbars, or the like), then it might be worth all the trouble...
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Thanks for your expertise, I'll keep that in mind when considering this tree as a potential specimen.

Any others with experience in collecting Ilex vomitoria. Insight into collecting this species would be great.

Has anyone ever seen a waxmyrtle bonsai? Many landscape companies in the area cultivate these for customer landscapes. Are they difficult to collect? I originally thought this would be a great specimen to experiment with.
 
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Attila Soos

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Any others with experience in collecting Ilex vomitoria. Insight into collecting this species would be great.
Ilex vomitoria (which you correctly identified) is probably the easiest plant on earth to collect, I once found one on the roadside, with almost no roots, thrown out by the lanscape contractors. It was laying on the roadside for almost a day, with exposed roots. I planted it in a bonsai mix and it survived, I still have it today.
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Does anyone else have any experience with wax myrtle. Any other input on this species would be great. Trying to mark possible specimen to collect fairly soon.
 
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