has anyone achieved the koyo turquoise?

hometeamrocker

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Sounds like a challenge. Post a photo of this alleged Koyo turquoise and we'll see what happens.
 

Solange

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If one does... We are not telling!
I know secrets about it, but haven't tried hard enough to pull it off.
I respect this... I understand wanting to figure it out but I also feel it would be best left alone.

I know the urge to discover a desirable glazes makeup, but on the other hand do we really want 10 million koyo turquoise slip casted coffee mugs? Commercialization by large industry is not out of the question for a glaze like this if it got out of the bag. Also, would it not devalue the original pieces and open the pandoras box of knockoffs? Not to mention, it feels a bit like stealing intellectual property or a piece of the artists identity or individual style.

To the actual process of discovery - even if someone had the original recipe in front of them they may not be successful in a direct copy. There are levels of multi-variables at play here - was it a reduction, oxidation, localized reduction firing? To what cone? Salt, ash? Wood, electric, gas? What was the ramping schedule, was there a soak? How about cooling? The clay body? Where were the original elements sourced from and are they available or authentic to what was used. Etc, etc, etc.. Some glazes transfer better with wider tolerances to these variables, others are highly dynamic. If one is trying to copy this they would at least have a better idea of a guess if they have at least tried to formulate their own glazes and replicated a few famous glazes of which the recipe is known, but even to someone very experienced it may be extremely difficult. The final tool in the copying handbook, which I have heard a few accounts of, with mixed results, is a forensic test of the chemical makeup. That would tell you exactly the ingredients and in what ratio. There is something both incredibly appealing and sad about that approach. Just some thoughts.

My own opinion is you shouldn't attempt to steal the magic, it will only end up with your disappointment or will kill the magic. Go your own way and knock out an original glaze that blows our pots off. Trying to copy it is a good intellectual exercise and will challenge your skills as a ceramicist, but in the end there is only one koyo turquoise, and we know who it belongs to. In your quest you will discover ten or twenty other possibilities, and one or two may have your own magic within. Replicate that one.
 

Anthony

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Yes, this is a problem with the Internet - copying
So a potter has a killer glaze and then someone shows up on ClayArt and asks how to do.
Good Year
Anthony
 

Solange

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Thanks a lot. Bummer it requires oxidation.
Don't give up that easy! As Eric pointed out, besides the color, the special thing about this glaze is the crystallization, which is achievable in reduction. I assume that is what your using based on your response. Also to flip Anthony's response - clayart has pages and pages of threads on oribes. There is more than one way to achieve something similar in your environment. A hint - most oribes are high fire reductions.
 
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Anthony

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Additionally. you can today add a carbide compound fo ran oxidation firing with reduction.
No need to damage your coils ----------- that much.
Happy Firing
Anthony
 

barrosinc

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Looks like I'm gonna have to buy an oribe glazed pot soon.
 
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