Hawaii version of akadama

Just Duane

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Hey gang, just thought i'd share what most members in our club uses for soil.

Soil is gathered from somewhere on the island (i haven't been shown where yet)

This first pic is unsifted.

hsoil2.jpg


First I screen out the big stuff, roots & other stuff included.

hsoil4.jpg


Then I screen out the (all screen sizes approximate) 1/2 in size.

hsoil5.jpg


Next is the 1/6 size.

hsoil6.jpg


& finally the 1/4 size.

hsoil7.jpg


Shot of all 3 sizes in buckets. The big ones can always be crushed to a smaller size or used as drainage layer (if you use a drainage layer)

hsoil9.jpg


This is black cinder that we get already screened from a guy on the big island (1/6-1/4 size)

hsoil8.jpg


Here is a comparison of Hawaiian soil on the top, akadama in the middle & black cinder & turface on the bottom.

hsoil12.jpg


Lotta work & little return, but its free:)
 

Just Duane

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buddhamonk, although this soil is not fired, it is still pretty hard. I am told the breakdown is nearly equal to akadama. Oh &, its free, can't get any cheaper than that:p
 

Rick Moquin

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Well when one looks at the proximity of Japan soil composition could very well be similar as Akadama is mined from volcanic regions I believe.
 
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Wonder if the Hawaii Department of Agriculture does soil sample analysis? Or if they have already done somethnig with that particular mineral mix? Or even some enterprising bonsai nut could have it done at their expense, could be a whole new industry there.

Perhaps fund a soil analysis of akadama and the Hawaiian material side by side to see if they contain the same mineral mix and have similar properties.
 
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Klytus

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I looked,there is much too much information on Hawaiian basalts.

Can the olivine sand be had?
 
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Just Duane

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Hi guys, I am told that the area this soil is gathered is not accessible to the general public. You have to know someone to let you in on the property & theres a gentlemans agreement between bonsai folks here to just take what you need & only for your personal use. I am also told this soil has been around for a long time.
 
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"I am also told this soil has been around for a long time."

Ahhhh......most has.:D
 

greerhw

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This should clear things up........

Soil is a natural body consisting of layers (soil horizons) of mineral constituents of variable thicknesses, which differ from the parent materials in their morphological, physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics.[1] It is composed of particles of broken rock that have been altered by chemical and environmental processes that include weathering and erosion. Soil differs from its parent rock due to interactions between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and the biosphere.[2] It is a mixture of mineral and organic constituents that are in solid, gaseous and aqueous states.[3][4] Soil particles pack loosely, forming a soil structure filled with pore spaces. These pores contain sol solution (liquid) and air (gas).[5] Accordingly, soils are often treated as a three state system.[6] Most soils have a density between 1 and 2 g/cm³. [7] Soil is also known as earth: it is the substance from which our planet takes its name. Little of the soil composition of planet Earth is older than Tertiary and most no older than Pleistocene.[8] In engineering, soil is referred to as regolith, or loose rock material.

keep it green,
Harry
 

Rick Moquin

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This should clear things up........

Soil is a natural body consisting of layers (soil horizons) of mineral constituents of variable thicknesses, which differ from the parent materials in their morphological, physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics.[1] It is composed of particles of broken rock that have been altered by chemical and environmental processes that include weathering and erosion. Soil differs from its parent rock due to interactions between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and the biosphere.[2] It is a mixture of mineral and organic constituents that are in solid, gaseous and aqueous states.[3][4] Soil particles pack loosely, forming a soil structure filled with pore spaces. These pores contain sol solution (liquid) and air (gas).[5] Accordingly, soils are often treated as a three state system.[6] Most soils have a density between 1 and 2 g/cm³. [7] Soil is also known as earth: it is the substance from which our planet takes its name. Little of the soil composition of planet Earth is older than Tertiary and most no older than Pleistocene.[8] In engineering, soil is referred to as regolith, or loose rock material.

keep it green,
Harry

Wow, is that really you Harry?;) Have a Mojita on me:)
 

Just Duane

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"I am also told this soil has been around for a long time."

Ahhhh......most has.:D



Sorry, what I meant to say was, bonsai folks have been using this soil in Hawaii for a long time. I had no idea this type of soil existed here in Hawaii. Thats another great thing about belonging to a club, you get the inside scoops.
 

Wm Tom Davis

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Gotta bring laulau an da kine to da bruddas on da udda si of da Pali... was staying near three weeks ago.

You ever visit the bonsai place over in Waimanalo?
 
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I looked,there is much too much information on Hawaiian basalts.

Can the olivine sand be had?

There is no reason for that.
There is a continuum from pumice (high silica content, low Fe and Mg) to lava rock like Hawaiian basalt (low silica content, high Fe and Mg thus lots of olivine).
 

Just Duane

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Gotta bring laulau an da kine to da bruddas on da udda si of da Pali... was staying near three weeks ago.

You ever visit the bonsai place over in Waimanalo?



Wow, thats very good kine pidgeon english you get brah! haha
Yes, i've been to Walter Liews place over in Waimanalo (Dragon Garden Bonsai Center)
I recomend visiting his place if anybody visits Oahu Hawaii.
 

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