Healed scars or wounds on Deciduous

BonsaiDTLA

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For many folks, it is prized to have a scar free trunk and seems that time will help blend wounds that have fully closed.

In my search to see results after some time has passed, I couldn't find a thread or much record on this other than a couple posts here and there.

Given how often we bonsai nuts make cuts, prune, and/or trunk chop, I'm curious to see both the "good" and "bad" scars from our community that have healed over time. Hoping to see pictures of healed scars on your trees and to learn of, if shared, any applicable methods used such as electrician foil-tape or putty/paste.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Well, some people will tell you not to use a wound sealer but they are dead-wrong and you shouldn’t listen to them.🍿🍿🍿

This thread shows a trident maple I grew with the goal of no visible scars. It shows the healing process from chops over the years, through full closure.

Here is one that has had less success closing, as the trunk rotted through. It’s still alive and well, and hollow, save for the wood filler.
 

BonsaiDTLA

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Brian, saw both posts before, which actually in-part prompted my posting. Appreciate your documenting the process over time.
 

leatherback

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Well.. Next year I can show you this trunk with virtually no cuts left, if it continues as it is closing now.
Except for the lowest: I am slowly removing a big lump of repeated cuts that created a 2 inch lump on the front of the tree. Annoying!



logo_20200906_100.jpglogo_20200906_101.jpg
 

leatherback

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When I was in the first years of bonsai I assumed that the bark would smoothen out coarse cuts. It will, partially. This big cut has been closed for some 4 years now. It still is ugly enough to consider cleaning it up, were it not that I am concerned I might not improve it. The tree was built from only the lower trunk up to the chop (Which is where the trunk continues another 10ft into the forest), and a one-year old side branch.

logo_20200906_48.jpg
 

zanduh

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When I was in the first years of bonsai I assumed that the bark would smoothen out coarse cuts. It will, partially. This big cut has been closed for some 4 years now. It still is ugly enough to consider cleaning it up, were it not that I am concerned I might not improve it. The tree was built from only the lower trunk up to the chop (Which is where the trunk continues another 10ft into the forest), and a one-year old side branch.

View attachment 327687
Off topic but what does your mesh do?
 

BonsaiDTLA

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Well.. Next year I can show you this trunk with virtually no cuts left, if it continues as it is closing now.
Except for the lowest: I am slowly removing a big lump of repeated cuts that created a 2 inch lump on the front of the tree. Annoying!



View attachment 327685View attachment 327686

Looking good, thanks for sharing! Hope it closes clean and well for you.

Are you only cutting open portions at a time and working in segments to ensure a better process?
 

leatherback

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Are you only cutting open portions at a time and working in segments to ensure a better process?
For the one in front, yes. THe rest I just opened up all, and let all branches run till about a month ago (Which is when I could not keep up with watering..)
 

coachspinks

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For the one in front, yes. THe rest I just opened up all, and let all branches run till about a month ago (Which is when I could not keep up with watering..)
Is there a time of year that is best for doing the carving? I have a maple with some branches that end in a stub/knob and I'd like to trim them.
 

leatherback

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Is there a time of year that is best for doing the carving?
I am a firm believer in mid-spring. Get some foliage on there. Get the juices flowing so the tree is ready to respond. Buuut.. I am coming to the conclusion that some species (e.g., beech) respond so well that you can get big knobs. So.. not completely sure.

I have done it so far in spring.
 

Davidlpf

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A good example of well closed wound in a palmatum maple
chans.jpg

After a few years
chans1.jpg

You can see the full tree in that video click,click

It takes time, but it is possible blend complete the bark even in huge wounds!!

To my fagus took 6 years close this one:


The deeper the wound, the better will close in long term.

I'm following the process of healing two "big" scars on my shishighasira here click,click They are not closed yet, but are in the way!! I hope that in two years more, they will be closed, and I will be able to do a similar video. ;)







Cheers.
 
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Brian Van Fleet

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It’s important to note that scars will close faster if you keep working the edges during the growing season. A couple times per year, I remove the cut paste, scrape down the rough scar tissue left behind, and re-expose the cambium along the edge of the callus.

Also, callus grows better across a smooth surface, and tends to not close well over rotted wood.

On my Shohin trident, I removed all rotted wood and replaced the entire core of the tree with epoxy putty, which provides a smooth surface for the callus to close over. I always re-seal the entire area with cut putty and/or paste.
 

leatherback

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How does that relate to instructions of filling holes with epoxy filler?

I think it is important to realize that deeper has a limit. but callus grows better "into a shallow carving" than "over a hill". A hollow trunk to not fill up:

callus grows better across a smooth surface, and tends to not close well over rotted wood.
 

sorce

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Is the shortness of this thread proof that this American infatuation with Trunk Chop shit doesn't work?

Ahem.

@MACH5 @William N. Valavanis ?

I know you fellers got some healed maples?

Sorce
 

Davidlpf

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How does that relate to instructions of filling holes with epoxy filler?
Ok, always the deep has a limit, and you can use epoxy for speed the filling in extreme situations ;) but you should leave enough room for the callus growth, in order to finally it doesn't overcome the trunk line


How deep you must go? Well, It depends on the specie, and the cause of the pruning.

I know you fellers got some healed maples?

Sorce


Trident maples healing extremely well. I don't have any personal example yet, last winter I purchase a stump, and I'm working on it, but in this article (in Spanish but with some clear photos) you can see that trunk chop works in trident maples if you know how to work with.

Cheers
 

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sorce

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American Elm.

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The big one is too hollow and not expected to close, the others probly will close. I don't rescar and haven't sealed these.

I believe rescarring is perceived as speeding things up because it's creating a "scar on a scar", which WILL add thickness. But time works just as well. Especially with trees allowed free growth.


Sorce
 

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