Hello Everyone !

AndresT

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I am Andres, I am a beginner in the need of help on getting in to the bonsai world, I have been watching videos and reading a lot, but I realized there are so many things I may need to ask. I hope to get your advice and hopefully not to get confused with the amount of information there may be. Also, English is not my language so sorry about that.
So, cheers everyone!

So, I just got this juniper don't know exactly what species is but, I would like to have some advice on how to procede with it I am thinking a semi cascade style, any suggestions? It has two large branches going to the sides with almost none going up.

I read you, thank you guys.
 

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AndresT

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Welcome!
Looks like a procumbens nana.
Usually chopping one for Jin and a good repot angle change will improve upon this situation.
Thank you for your answer.
What do you thing the angle should be ? I was planning to cut one of the side branches but which one,
I haven't think on the Jin idea but again which one.😓
 

Eckhoffw

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Hmmm... that’s tough without more pics. I’d pick the branch that seems to flow from the trunk best.
 

River's Edge

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The tree appears to have been recently repotted and tied in to the pot. Are you aware off how much work has been done on the tree recently. Say within the past year? That is always a factor in what should be done or can be done.
 

AndresT

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The tree appears to have been recently repotted and tied in to the pot. Are you aware off how much work has been done on the tree recently. Say within the past year? That is always a factor in what should be done or can be done.
The history of the tree is, I bought it about a year and a half ago, and planted on my garden and never really do anything on it, It has been growing there for about the entire pandemic, I recently repoted it with the idea to cut the right branch and make a semi cascade. Does that information helps?
By the way, I took a couple pictures today, the one with the white bag is the idea I had in mind. (took that trick from Peter Chan´s Youtube channel)
 

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River's Edge

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Thanks for the response, the reason I asked is that it is wise to give the tree time to recover after a repot. For that reason I would not plan on removing a major branch or foliage at this time.
The key to a cascade is a tree that appears to move naturally to the side and down from low on the trunk! Your tree appears to have reasonable nebari on a fairly straight trunk upwards. Changing the potting angle by very much may cause you to lose the balanced nebari. I think you should consider these aspects.
Currently the tree is potted fairly high and appears to have better roots on the right side, you should keep that in mind if changing the planting angle, and do so to the left. If you do decide to remove one major branch, the one on the right seems to have a bit of reverse taper where it leaves the trunk. So I would choose that one to remove.
I would also consider the option of removing part of the left branch and working with a single trunk upright form. Always good to look at every possibility before hacking off material. Just some thoughts for your consideration.
 

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AndresT

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Thanks for the response, the reason I asked is that it is wise to give the tree time to recover after a repot. For that reason I would not plan on removing a major branch or foliage at this time.
The key to a cascade is a tree that appears to move naturally to the side and down from low on the trunk! Your tree appears to have reasonable nebari on a fairly straight trunk upwards. Changing the potting angle by very much may cause you to lose the balanced nebari. I think you should consider these aspects.
Currently the tree is potted fairly high and appears to have better roots on the right side, you should keep that in mind if changing the planting angle, and do so to the left. If you do decide to remove one major branch, the one on the right seems to have a bit of reverse taper where it leaves the trunk. So I would choose that one to remove.
I would also consider the option of removing part of the left branch and working with a single trunk upright form. Always good to look at every possibility before hacking off material. Just some thoughts for your consideration.
Thank you so much, I really appreciate your advice, I was considering to let the tree alone for a bit, you confirmed my thoughts, but, do you thing is a good idea if a re-repot the tree a little bit lower, keeping the planting angle or do I leave it like that? since I just repoted it yesterday.
 

Potawatomi13

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Hi Ecuador. Please add location to profile so any advice can be given based in location. Also climate Zone. Is there Bonsai club near you to get in person help? Many conflicting opinions/bad advice happens here making in person instruction usually best of all;).
 

River's Edge

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Thank you so much, I really appreciate your advice, I was considering to let the tree alone for a bit, you confirmed my thoughts, but, do you thing is a good idea if a re-repot the tree a little bit lower, keeping the planting angle or do I leave it like that? since I just repoted it yesterday.
Given that you appear to be new to the hobby I would let it recover at this point. I agree with the above advice to seek out a local club for advice pertinent to your location and climate.
 

River's Edge

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Thank you guys, it is not very popular down here, I but I will look for a local club, and really wish to listen to you all too.
You should feel welcome to ask and share on the forum. Please continue.
If you are posing a question for the group, a couple of things will go a long way to assist the advice you receive.
1. A bit of history on the tree in question, how long you have cared for it? What work, if any has been done on the tree in the past year? What work are you planning to do in the coming year?
2. What is your vision for the tree?
3. Level of training and or experience you have with Bonsai.
It is always helpful to know your location and climate. It can be difficult to assess these important factors just from a picture and a posed question. Be wary of advice received from those who have a strong opinion even though they do not have the background of your situation and the trees condition. Your first experience was a great example of individuals jumping in to assist with little understanding of the situation.

For the near future I would gather a few basic reference books as a start to ensure a basic understanding of when to work on trees and how much should be done within certain timeframes. Work on learning how to provide general care for the trees. There are a lot of good basic reference books on Bonsai published within the last ten years that contain very up to date techniques and procedures for a wide variety of material.

If you are watching u tubes or zoom presentations always ask yourself if this is relevant to the age, type of tree or stage of development your tree is in?
Techniques and procedures vary greatly for species, cultivars and the timing varies as well.
If you can find a local club or well trained person focus on fundamentals first.
1. Daily care routine for your climate.
2. Sources for supplies and tools
3. Technique training in Repotting, Wiring, Pruning.
4. How to plan your work and stage the appropriate timing for the health off the tree.
5. Work with trees that do well in your location in the beginning for best results.

Most importantly, have fun with trees and the people who share your interest.
 

AndresT

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You should feel welcome to ask and share on the forum. Please continue.
If you are posing a question for the group, a couple of things will go a long way to assist the advice you receive.
1. A bit of history on the tree in question, how long you have cared for it? What work, if any has been done on the tree in the past year? What work are you planning to do in the coming year?
2. What is your vision for the tree?
3. Level of training and or experience you have with Bonsai.
It is always helpful to know your location and climate. It can be difficult to assess these important factors just from a picture and a posed question. Be wary of advice received from those who have a strong opinion even though they do not have the background of your situation and the trees condition. Your first experience was a great example of individuals jumping in to assist with little understanding of the situation.

For the near future I would gather a few basic reference books as a start to ensure a basic understanding of when to work on trees and how much should be done within certain timeframes. Work on learning how to provide general care for the trees. There are a lot of good basic reference books on Bonsai published within the last ten years that contain very up to date techniques and procedures for a wide variety of material.

If you are watching u tubes or zoom presentations always ask yourself if this is relevant to the age, type of tree or stage of development your tree is in?
Techniques and procedures vary greatly for species, cultivars and the timing varies as well.
If you can find a local club or well trained person focus on fundamentals first.
1. Daily care routine for your climate.
2. Sources for supplies and tools
3. Technique training in Repotting, Wiring, Pruning.
4. How to plan your work and stage the appropriate timing for the health off the tree.
5. Work with trees that do well in your location in the beginning for best results.

Most importantly, have fun with trees and the people who share your interest.
Grate thank you so much. For sure I will keep posting. I was searching and I happen to find a bonsai exhibition next month so I may ask them for a club or any other information they may give me.
Can you suggest any book I can start with?
 

River's Edge

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Grate thank you so much. For sure I will keep posting. I was searching and I happen to find a bonsai exhibition next month so I may ask them for a club or any other information they may give me.
Can you suggest any book I can start with?
Here is the first half a dozen that come to mind. Some will be easier to obtain than others. For basic and easy to obtain #3 and #5.
Most recent and highly recommended #1 and#2. More advanced but valuable if you wish to advance, #4 and #6.
1.The Little Book of Bonsai. by Jonas Dupuich
2.Bonsai Heresy by Michael Hagedorn
3.Bonsai techniques, styles, display ideas by Peter Warren
4.Principles of Bonsai Design by David De Groot
5.Bonsai Basics, Colin Lewis
6. Bonsai Aesthetics by Francois Jeker

Best in Bonsai
Frank
 
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