Help Identify This Jade Species Please

artao

Sapling
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Location
SW Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5a
#1
I got a three jade cuttings via the local facebook buy/sell page. Apparently they were the lady's daughter's science experiment LOL. All three had decent-ish roots, but one had too much sideways growth underground, so I cut that off and let it dry for a couple days before putting it in soil (that one is not in picture). As you can see in the pic, I also stuck all the leaves I took off into soil as well in hopes that some of 'em will root.
ANYHOW!
My question is, what type of jade is this? I'm kinda guessing they're too young to tell. Thanks :)
Some Jade Sproutlings.jpg
 
Messages
271
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276
Location
SE MI
USDA Zone
5b
#7
I got a three jade cuttings via the local facebook buy/sell page. Apparently they were the lady's daughter's science experiment LOL. All three had decent-ish roots, but one had too much sideways growth underground, so I cut that off and let it dry for a couple days before putting it in soil (that one is not in picture). As you can see in the pic, I also stuck all the leaves I took off into soil as well in hopes that some of 'em will root.
ANYHOW!
My question is, what type of jade is this? I'm kinda guessing they're too young to tell. Thanks :)
View attachment 195943
Looks a lot like baby C. ovata. Standard jade plant. Darn hard to kill.

I've never had one that did well in standard potting soil. They've just kinda limped along, and I've even managed to give one root rot with it. Mine have always been much happier in 1/2 pea gravel, 4/5 sand, 1/5 organic or 2/3 gravel, 1/3 sand. That second mix ratio is free-draining enough that you can just about water them daily.
 
Messages
49
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19
Location
SW Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5a
#11
Right now I've got the actual rooted plants in 50/50 pearlite/sand (the sand was gathered locally with the juniper I collected. it's a sand-heavy kinda clay-ey dirt. Ancient alluvial floodplain from the Wisconsin River.
 

AlainK

Masterpiece
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Orléans, France, Europe
USDA Zone
8A
#13
Ancient alluvial floodplain from the Wisconsin River.
Alluvial soil is one of the best medium for many plants, that's why there are lots of horticulturists and tree nurseries around where I live. Orléans and the region is famous for its roses, and so are other cities in the Loire valley.
 

AlainK

Masterpiece
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Orléans, France, Europe
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#14
Thanks. Very informative. NOW I can look at ANY jade and tell what it is :\
OK :cool:

Here are three cuttings from succulents.

On the left, a Portacula Afra, and a small Crassula compacta. On the right, a Crassula ovata. these cuttings were kept inside until the photo was taken a few minutes ago: they're not in their best shape, the leaves are paler than they should be and the internodes longer, even if they were by a window:

succulents_180612a.jpg

But you can probably see the differences:

1/ Portulacaria has smaller, thinner leaves, and slightly longer internodes;
2/ the colour of the leaves are a lighter green, on Crassula ovata, even when kept indoors, the leaves are a draker green, thicker, "waxier", with some reddish hue on the edges. When gradually put un full sun, the red edge is even more showing.
3/ Portulacaria secondary branches tend to grow naturally at 90° angle, whereas new shoots on Crassula are more between 30 to 45 °
4/ it's much easier to keep a Crassula healthy indoors than a Portulacaria.

Portulacaria afra:

succulents_180612b.jpg

Crassula ovata:

succulents_180612c.jpg
But that's from my own experience, and my son's. In places with a (nearly) sub-tropical climates Florida (hot and humid), Portulmacaria seems to be the favourite, probably because it's closer to the original environment.

In drier places, or places where you can't keep them outside in the winter, Crassula fares better.

So i think in winsconsin, Crassula is probably more suitable.

OK now? ;)

I'll post one of mine later, or in a few days.
 

AlainK

Masterpiece
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#15
On top of that:

It's so easy to take cuttings.

Either you cut out a branch, or simply a leaf. Most succulents can be propagated by leaf cuttings : just put a leaf on a dry medium. after a few day, roots will form. Water very sparingly. Here is an eaample with a µcrassula that I definitely must prune. On its right, there's a "tomato pot" (6x6x7.5 cm plastic pot filled with... whatever, these plants can grow on almost anything:

succulents_180612e.jpg

A close-up on the leaf-cutting:

succulents_180612d.jpg

I wish maples, and pines, would be so easy to propagate...
 

AlainK

Masterpiece
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Location
Orléans, France, Europe
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8A
#16
Another example of Crassula cuttings (crassula 'Gollum') : I pruned one about 10 days ago, and let the cuts dry out, no watering.

More plants to give to my friends. I'll ship some to Greece I think :)

You can see that after a week or so, roots appear. The cut has dried out, so fewer risks of rot, and now it can be repotted.

succulents_180612f.jpg

Like the type-species, this cultivar displays red edges when gradually adapted to full sun.

A very nice little plant... :cool:
 

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