Help me identify my new shears

Dreamcast

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Hello.

Iam new to the forum, and this is my first post.

I recently got this shears at an auction for around 20$

This is how it looked when i got it.
128310502_1.jpg
128310502_2.jpg
And after some work was done it now shines really nice.
2011 146...2.jpg
2011 145...2.jpg
Close up.jpg
I would like to know who made it, and if its old or new, but since i cant read japanese its hard for me to get any info on it.

So i am hoping someone here can help me with this.

//Dreamcast
 
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Smoke

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These are all purpose shears from Japan. Mostly used for cutting thick stems on plants and flowers used for Ikabana. When used for bonsai they are mostly relagated to root pruning because of the thick jaws and the fact that one can get their whole hand in the shears for leverage rather than just finger tips. These shears are not well suited for fine trimming work most asscociated with bonsai, but whatever gets the job done, right.

I am thinking these are under the trade name Kifu or Kiku, from the late 70's or early 80's.
 

Dreamcast

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Thanks for that info Smoke :) do you know if its a good quality shears?

you do not by any chance know what the ingraved japanese mean, or is that the name Kifu or Kiku?
 

alonsou

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I can't read japanese either but I can read quality, and as far as I can see by your images both shears seems of very good quality, I would not be too worry as far as finding what they read, as long as they work as they should and you take proper care of them, they should last for many years to come.
 

Dreamcast

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Thanks alonsou :) but all photos are of the same shears, before and after i cleaned it.

Its nice to hear it looks like good quality :) and i must say it feels alot diffrent from my other shears witch i think is student grade.
And if one looks close on the blades it has the same texture in the metal as those old fedual katanas.
 

rockm

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As Smoke said, these are most likely Kiku ikebana shears and not really bonsai shears per se. I've seen them sold (and I have a pair myself) at garden centers at retail displays of bonsai and ikebana for years. Kiku is a pretty common brand and has been around since the 1980s or so in the U.S. They're OK, nothing extremely special about them. They're definitely a step up from chinese tools. As far as bonsai use, they're really not all that terrific, as the handles don't provide a lot of easy manipulation for finer work. They're fine for cutting roots, but, again the handles don't allow much leverage on thicker, tougher roots.
 

Dreamcast

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Thank you for the info rockm, it feels good to know alittle more about this shears.

Was hoping it was something more special, but it feels like a solid shears, and since i only gave 20$ for it iam not dissapointed at all.

I am sure it will come to some use, and its allways nice to add something new to the tool box.

Thanks to everyone for the help :)

(I am still interested to know what the ingraved japanese means, so if someone can read it, please let me know)
 

rockm

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FWIW, the engraving is probably the name of the maker--such markings are not unnusual on decent tools.

Also FWIW, tools are rarely valuable as antique bonsai stuff. Old tools, are, well, old tools. They go through a tremendous amount of wear and are pretty useless after a few years, especially in the west, where we don't have the sharpening techniques needed to rejuvenate them.

Tools can be collectible, but mostly only if they have some sort of mostly documented provenance or unnusual, notable history.

If you're looking for bonsai stuff that holds its value or appreciates, start getting to know quality antique bonsai pots...They age a lot better than tools and if you run across a decent one, or even a rare one, at a garage sale, you might find something worth a couple of thousand dollars for $5...It's happened.
 

Dreamcast

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Yeah i allways go to every garage sales i can, and have my eyes open for pots and other bonsai stuff, and some old transformers and stuff that made me happy as a child :D
would love to find something for 5$ thats worth that much!!

Thanks for the input on the ingraved japanese to :)
 

Smoke

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The engraved part says "Made in USA"
 

Dreamcast

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Smoke, haha you must be joking? :confused: it says Japan in clear english on the other side....
 
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Smoke

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Would that be an oxymoron?

It says "Japan in clear english"?
 

Dreamcast

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Smoke, sorry english is not my first language, so i had to look up what "oxymoron" is, and i guess it was one? if so, not ment to be.

Just wanted to say it say Japan on the other side.

and if it sounded rude or anything it was not ment to be that either.
 
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Dreamcast

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Smoke, after reading some more about oxymoron, i found that its a form of insult? :eek: i am so sorry if it sounded like one!

I would be very glad if you would like to drop by my other thread in "Stands" and tell me what you think.

(you where joking about the "made in usa" right?)
 

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